Laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy: Early Mayo Clinic experience

P. A. Dean, R. W. Beart, Heidi Nelson, T. D. Elftmann, R. T. Schlinkert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To present a large initial series of patients who underwent laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy and to assess the feasibility and safety of this procedure. Design: We summarized the clinical outcome data for 122 Mayo Clinic patients selected for laparoscopic-assisted resection of the right, left, or sigmoid colon between 1991 and 1993. Material and Methods: Preexisting factors (such as obesity and prior abdominal operations), indications for surgical treatment, and intraoperative and postoperative complications were analyzed statistically in two groups of patients - those in whom the laparoscopic procedure was completed and those in whom conversion to an open surgical technique was necessary. Results: Laparoscopic-assisted colectomy was successfully completed for a variety of colonic pathologic conditions, including polyps, cancer, and diverticulitis. No operative deaths occurred in this series, and the overall complication rate was low (11%). Patients in whom laparoscopic-assisted colectomy was completed had a more rapid return of bowel function and a briefer hospital stay than did those who required conversion to the traditional open surgical technique. Neither obesity nor previous abdominal surgical procedures precluded successful laparoscopic-assisted colectomy, although the conversion rate to open colectomy was 75% in patients whose weight exceeded 90 kg. Conclusion: These findings indicate that laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy is safe and feasible, and the procedure may offer patient-related advantages. Oncologic concerns, including recent reports of trocar site recurrences, suggest a cautious approach to its application for resection of colonic cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)834-840
Number of pages7
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume69
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1994

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Colectomy
Diverticulitis
Abdominal Obesity
Intraoperative Complications
Sigmoid Colon
Polyps
Surgical Instruments
Colonic Neoplasms
Length of Stay
Obesity
Safety
Weights and Measures
Recurrence
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Dean, P. A., Beart, R. W., Nelson, H., Elftmann, T. D., & Schlinkert, R. T. (1994). Laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy: Early Mayo Clinic experience. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 69(9), 834-840.

Laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy : Early Mayo Clinic experience. / Dean, P. A.; Beart, R. W.; Nelson, Heidi; Elftmann, T. D.; Schlinkert, R. T.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 69, No. 9, 1994, p. 834-840.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dean, PA, Beart, RW, Nelson, H, Elftmann, TD & Schlinkert, RT 1994, 'Laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy: Early Mayo Clinic experience', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 69, no. 9, pp. 834-840.
Dean PA, Beart RW, Nelson H, Elftmann TD, Schlinkert RT. Laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy: Early Mayo Clinic experience. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1994;69(9):834-840.
Dean, P. A. ; Beart, R. W. ; Nelson, Heidi ; Elftmann, T. D. ; Schlinkert, R. T. / Laparoscopic-assisted segmental colectomy : Early Mayo Clinic experience. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1994 ; Vol. 69, No. 9. pp. 834-840.
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