Laboratory and clinical characteristics of Staphylococcus lugdunensis prosthetic joint infections

Neel B. Shah, Douglas R. Osmon, Hind Fadel, Robin Patel, Peggy C. Kohner, James M. Steckelberg, Tad Mabry, Elie F. Berbari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus that has several similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is increasingly being recognized as a cause of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The goal of the present retrospective cohort study was to determine the laboratory and clinical characteristics of S. lugdunensis PJIs seen at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2007. Kaplan-Meier survival methods and Wilcoxon sum-rank analysis were used to determine the cumulative incidence of treatment success and assess subset comparisons. There were 28 episodes of S. lugdunensis PJIs in 22 patients; half of those patients were females. Twenty-five episodes (89%) involved the prosthetic knee, while 3 (11%) involved the hip. Nine patients (32%) had an underlying urogenital abnormality. Among the 28 isolates in this study tested by agar dilution, 24 of 28 (86%) were oxacillin susceptible. Twenty of the 21 tested isolates (95%) lacked mecA, and 6 (27%) of the 22 isolates tested produced β-lactamase. The median durations of parenteral β-lactam therapy and vancomycin therapy were 38 days (range, 23 to 42 days) and 39 days (range, 12 to 60 days), respectively. The cumulative incidences of freedom from treatment failure (standard deviations) at 2 years were 92% (±7%) and 76% (±12%) for episodes treated with a parenteral β-lactam and vancomycin, respectively (P = 0.015). S. lugdunensis is increasingly being recognized as a cause of PJIs. The majority of the isolates lacked mecA. Episodes treated with a parenteral β-lactam antibiotic appear to have a more favorable outcome than those treated with parenteral vancomycin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1600-1603
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Staphylococcus lugdunensis
Lactams
Joints
Vancomycin
Infection
Urogenital Abnormalities
Oxacillin
Coagulase
Incidence
Treatment Failure
Staphylococcus
Agar
Staphylococcus aureus
Hip
Knee
Cohort Studies
Therapeutics
Retrospective Studies
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Laboratory and clinical characteristics of Staphylococcus lugdunensis prosthetic joint infections. / Shah, Neel B.; Osmon, Douglas R.; Fadel, Hind; Patel, Robin; Kohner, Peggy C.; Steckelberg, James M.; Mabry, Tad; Berbari, Elie F.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 48, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 1600-1603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shah, Neel B. ; Osmon, Douglas R. ; Fadel, Hind ; Patel, Robin ; Kohner, Peggy C. ; Steckelberg, James M. ; Mabry, Tad ; Berbari, Elie F. / Laboratory and clinical characteristics of Staphylococcus lugdunensis prosthetic joint infections. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 1600-1603.
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