Knee Biomechanical Deficits During a Single-Leg Landing Task Are Addressed With Neuromuscular Training in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Athletes

Christopher V. Nagelli, Stephanie Di Stasi, Samuel C. Wordeman, Albert Chen, Rachel Tatarski, Joshua Hoffman, Timothy E. Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Faulty neuromuscular and biomechanical deficits of the knee are nearly ubiquitous in athletes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR). Knee biomechanical deficits are directly associated with an increased risk of second ACL injury, which typically occurs during a sports-related movement on a single limb. To date, the biomechanical effects of a neuromuscular training (NMT) program on knee biomechanics during a single-leg landing task have not been investigated. DESIGN: Prospective Cohort Study. SETTING: Controlled laboratory setting. PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen ACLR and 10 control athletes. INTERVENTIONS: Neuromuscular training. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Knee kinematics and kinetics. RESULTS: There were no significant interactions of session and limb (P > 0.05) for the athletes with ACLR after training. However, there were several significant main effects of session (P < 0.05) for knee kinematics and kinetics during the single-leg landing task. After training, the athletes with ACLR landed with greater knee flexion angles, decreased knee abduction angles, increased knee flexion range of motion, and decreased knee excursion. Also, the ACLR athletes landed with lower knee flexion moments, greater knee adduction moments, and lower peak vertical ground reaction force. Post-training comparison of the ACLR and control cohorts found no significant interactions of group and limb (P > 0.05) and only a significant main effect of group (P < 0.05) for frontal plane knee angle at initial contact. The athletes with ACLR landed with greater knee adduction angles than the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Deficits in knee biomechanics that are associated with an increased risk of ACL injury are attenuated after completion of this NMT program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e347-e353
JournalClinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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