KDIGO Controversies Conference on onco-nephrology: kidney disease in hematological malignancies and the burden of cancer after kidney transplantation

Conference Participants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The bidirectional relationship between cancer and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is complex. Patients with cancer, particularly those with hematological malignancies such as multiple myeloma and lymphoma, are at increased risk of developing acute kidney injury and CKD. On the other hand, emerging evidence from large observational registry analyses have consistently shown that cancer risk is increased by at least 2- to 3-fold in kidney transplant recipients, and the observed increased risk occurs not only in those who have received kidney transplants but also in those on dialysis and with mild- to moderate-stage CKD. The interactions between cancer and CKD have raised major therapeutic and clinical challenges in the management of these patients. Given the magnitude of the problem and uncertainties, and current controversies within the existing evidence, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) assembled a global panel of multidisciplinary clinical and scientific expertise for a controversies conference on onco-nephrology to identify key management issues in nephrology relevant to patients with malignancy. This report covers the discussed controversies in kidney disease in hematological malignancies, as well as cancer after kidney transplantation. An overview of future research priorities is also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1407-1418
Number of pages12
JournalKidney international
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • chemotherapy
  • chronic kidney disease
  • kidney transplantation
  • oncology
  • tumor lysis syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'KDIGO Controversies Conference on onco-nephrology: kidney disease in hematological malignancies and the burden of cancer after kidney transplantation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this