Ischemic stroke: Outcomes, patient mix, and practice variation for neurologists and generalists in a community

G. W. Petty, Robert D Jr. Brown, J. P. Whisnant, J. D. Sicks, W. M. O'Fallon, D. O. Wiebers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A variety of methods was used to compare patient mix, practice variation, survival, and recurrence after first ischemic stroke among Rochester, MN residents. The significance of the results for neurologists and generalists was examined. Age, stroke severity, congestive heart failure (CHF), and the interaction between atrial fibrillation and patient groups were determinants of survival. Without atrial fibrillation, patients on neurology services and patients on general services with neurology consultation had better survival than those without neurology consultation, adjusting for age, stroke severity, and CHF. With atrial fibrillation, patients on general services with neurology consultation had no better survival compared with those without neurology consultation; patients on neurology services had worse survival (p = 0.002). There was no difference in stroke recurrence. Evaluation by a neurologist is associated with better survival for most patients with ischemic stroke but not those with atrial fibrillation. Only a randomized trial can determine whether this association is causal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1669-1678
Number of pages10
JournalNeurology
Volume50
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1998

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Neurology
Stroke
Atrial Fibrillation
Survival
Referral and Consultation
Heart Failure
Recurrence
Neurologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Petty, G. W., Brown, R. D. J., Whisnant, J. P., Sicks, J. D., O'Fallon, W. M., & Wiebers, D. O. (1998). Ischemic stroke: Outcomes, patient mix, and practice variation for neurologists and generalists in a community. Neurology, 50(6), 1669-1678.

Ischemic stroke : Outcomes, patient mix, and practice variation for neurologists and generalists in a community. / Petty, G. W.; Brown, Robert D Jr.; Whisnant, J. P.; Sicks, J. D.; O'Fallon, W. M.; Wiebers, D. O.

In: Neurology, Vol. 50, No. 6, 06.1998, p. 1669-1678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Petty, GW, Brown, RDJ, Whisnant, JP, Sicks, JD, O'Fallon, WM & Wiebers, DO 1998, 'Ischemic stroke: Outcomes, patient mix, and practice variation for neurologists and generalists in a community', Neurology, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 1669-1678.
Petty GW, Brown RDJ, Whisnant JP, Sicks JD, O'Fallon WM, Wiebers DO. Ischemic stroke: Outcomes, patient mix, and practice variation for neurologists and generalists in a community. Neurology. 1998 Jun;50(6):1669-1678.
Petty, G. W. ; Brown, Robert D Jr. ; Whisnant, J. P. ; Sicks, J. D. ; O'Fallon, W. M. ; Wiebers, D. O. / Ischemic stroke : Outcomes, patient mix, and practice variation for neurologists and generalists in a community. In: Neurology. 1998 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 1669-1678.
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