Is there a language divide in Pap test use?

Ninez A. Ponce, Neetu Chawla, Susan H. Babey, Melissa S. Gatchell, David A. Etzioni, Benjamin A. Spencer, E. Richard Brown, Nancy Breen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether primary language use, measured by language of interview, is associated with disparities in cervical cancer screening. DATA SOURCES: We undertook a secondary data analysis of a pooled sample of the 2001 and 2003 California Health Interview Surveys. The surveys were conducted in English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, and Vietnamese. STUDY DESIGN: The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 3-year Pap test use among women ages 18 to 64, with no reported cervical cancer diagnosis or hysterectomy (n = 38,931). In addition to language of interview, other factors studied included race/ethnicity, marital status, income, educational attainment, years lived in the United States, insurance status, usual source of care, smoking status, area of residence, and self-rated health status. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: We fit weighted multivariate logit models predicting 3-year Pap test use as a function of language of interview, adjusting for the effects of specified covariates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared with the referent English interview group, women who interviewed in Spanish were 1.65 times more likely to receive a Pap test in the past 3 years. In contrast, we observed a significantly reduced risk of screening among women who interviewed in Vietnamese (odds ratio [OR] 0.67; confidence interval [CI] 0.48-0.93), Cantonese (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.30-0.66), Mandarin (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.33-0.72), and Korean (OR 0.62; 0.40-0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Improved language access could reduce cancer screening disparities, especially in the Asian immigrant community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)998-1004
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Care
Volume44
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papanicolaou Test
Language
Interviews
Odds Ratio
interview
language
cancer
confidence
Confidence Intervals
Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Insurance Coverage
secondary analysis
Marital Status
Health Surveys
Hysterectomy
marital status
Health Status
insurance
health status

Keywords

  • Language disparities
  • Pap test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Ponce, N. A., Chawla, N., Babey, S. H., Gatchell, M. S., Etzioni, D. A., Spencer, B. A., ... Breen, N. (2006). Is there a language divide in Pap test use? Medical Care, 44(11), 998-1004. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000233676.61237.ef

Is there a language divide in Pap test use? / Ponce, Ninez A.; Chawla, Neetu; Babey, Susan H.; Gatchell, Melissa S.; Etzioni, David A.; Spencer, Benjamin A.; Brown, E. Richard; Breen, Nancy.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 44, No. 11, 11.2006, p. 998-1004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ponce, NA, Chawla, N, Babey, SH, Gatchell, MS, Etzioni, DA, Spencer, BA, Brown, ER & Breen, N 2006, 'Is there a language divide in Pap test use?', Medical Care, vol. 44, no. 11, pp. 998-1004. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000233676.61237.ef
Ponce NA, Chawla N, Babey SH, Gatchell MS, Etzioni DA, Spencer BA et al. Is there a language divide in Pap test use? Medical Care. 2006 Nov;44(11):998-1004. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000233676.61237.ef
Ponce, Ninez A. ; Chawla, Neetu ; Babey, Susan H. ; Gatchell, Melissa S. ; Etzioni, David A. ; Spencer, Benjamin A. ; Brown, E. Richard ; Breen, Nancy. / Is there a language divide in Pap test use?. In: Medical Care. 2006 ; Vol. 44, No. 11. pp. 998-1004.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether primary language use, measured by language of interview, is associated with disparities in cervical cancer screening. DATA SOURCES: We undertook a secondary data analysis of a pooled sample of the 2001 and 2003 California Health Interview Surveys. The surveys were conducted in English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, and Vietnamese. STUDY DESIGN: The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 3-year Pap test use among women ages 18 to 64, with no reported cervical cancer diagnosis or hysterectomy (n = 38,931). In addition to language of interview, other factors studied included race/ethnicity, marital status, income, educational attainment, years lived in the United States, insurance status, usual source of care, smoking status, area of residence, and self-rated health status. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: We fit weighted multivariate logit models predicting 3-year Pap test use as a function of language of interview, adjusting for the effects of specified covariates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared with the referent English interview group, women who interviewed in Spanish were 1.65 times more likely to receive a Pap test in the past 3 years. In contrast, we observed a significantly reduced risk of screening among women who interviewed in Vietnamese (odds ratio [OR] 0.67; confidence interval [CI] 0.48-0.93), Cantonese (OR 0.44; 95{\%} CI 0.30-0.66), Mandarin (OR 0.48; 95{\%} CI 0.33-0.72), and Korean (OR 0.62; 0.40-0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Improved language access could reduce cancer screening disparities, especially in the Asian immigrant community.",
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AB - OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether primary language use, measured by language of interview, is associated with disparities in cervical cancer screening. DATA SOURCES: We undertook a secondary data analysis of a pooled sample of the 2001 and 2003 California Health Interview Surveys. The surveys were conducted in English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, and Vietnamese. STUDY DESIGN: The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 3-year Pap test use among women ages 18 to 64, with no reported cervical cancer diagnosis or hysterectomy (n = 38,931). In addition to language of interview, other factors studied included race/ethnicity, marital status, income, educational attainment, years lived in the United States, insurance status, usual source of care, smoking status, area of residence, and self-rated health status. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: We fit weighted multivariate logit models predicting 3-year Pap test use as a function of language of interview, adjusting for the effects of specified covariates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared with the referent English interview group, women who interviewed in Spanish were 1.65 times more likely to receive a Pap test in the past 3 years. In contrast, we observed a significantly reduced risk of screening among women who interviewed in Vietnamese (odds ratio [OR] 0.67; confidence interval [CI] 0.48-0.93), Cantonese (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.30-0.66), Mandarin (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.33-0.72), and Korean (OR 0.62; 0.40-0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Improved language access could reduce cancer screening disparities, especially in the Asian immigrant community.

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