Irritable bowel syndrome in the United States

Prevalence, symptom patterns and impact

A. P S Hungin, L. Chang, G. R. Locke, E. H. Dennis, V. Barghout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

317 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The impact of irritable bowel syndrome, a gastrointestinal motility disorder, is underestimated and poorly quantified, as clinicians may see only a minority of sufferers. Aim: To determine the prevalence, symptom patterns and impact of irritable bowel syndrome in the US. Methods: This two-phase community survey used quota sampling and random-digit telephone dialling (screening interview) to identify individuals with medically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome or individuals not formally diagnosed, but fulfilling irritable bowel syndrome diagnostic criteria (Manning, Rome I or II). Information on irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, general health status, lifestyle and impact of symptoms on individuals' lives was collected using in-depth follow-up interviews. Data were also collected for healthy controls identified in the screening interviews. Results: The total prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in 5009 screening interviews was 14.1% (medically diagnosed: 3.3%; undiagnosed, but meeting irritable bowel syndrome criteria: 10.8%). Abdominal pain/ discomfort was the most common symptom prompting consultation. Most sufferers (74% medically diagnosed; 63% undiagnosed) reported alternating constipation and diarrhoea. Previously diagnosed gastrointestinal disorders occurred more often in sufferers than non-sufferers. Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers had more days off work (6.4 vs. 3.0) and days in bed, and reduced activities to a greater extent than non-sufferers. Conclusions: Most (76.6%) irritable bowel syndrome sufferers in the US are undiagnosed. Irritable bowel syndrome has a substantial impact on sufferers' well-being and health, with considerable socioeconomic consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1365-1375
Number of pages11
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

Fingerprint

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Interviews
Gastrointestinal Motility
Constipation
Telephone
Abdominal Pain
Health Status
Life Style
Diarrhea
Referral and Consultation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Irritable bowel syndrome in the United States : Prevalence, symptom patterns and impact. / Hungin, A. P S; Chang, L.; Locke, G. R.; Dennis, E. H.; Barghout, V.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 21, No. 11, 01.06.2005, p. 1365-1375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hungin, A. P S ; Chang, L. ; Locke, G. R. ; Dennis, E. H. ; Barghout, V. / Irritable bowel syndrome in the United States : Prevalence, symptom patterns and impact. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2005 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 1365-1375.
@article{7940565b336441ff88c090a82aeefcf8,
title = "Irritable bowel syndrome in the United States: Prevalence, symptom patterns and impact",
abstract = "Background: The impact of irritable bowel syndrome, a gastrointestinal motility disorder, is underestimated and poorly quantified, as clinicians may see only a minority of sufferers. Aim: To determine the prevalence, symptom patterns and impact of irritable bowel syndrome in the US. Methods: This two-phase community survey used quota sampling and random-digit telephone dialling (screening interview) to identify individuals with medically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome or individuals not formally diagnosed, but fulfilling irritable bowel syndrome diagnostic criteria (Manning, Rome I or II). Information on irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, general health status, lifestyle and impact of symptoms on individuals' lives was collected using in-depth follow-up interviews. Data were also collected for healthy controls identified in the screening interviews. Results: The total prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in 5009 screening interviews was 14.1{\%} (medically diagnosed: 3.3{\%}; undiagnosed, but meeting irritable bowel syndrome criteria: 10.8{\%}). Abdominal pain/ discomfort was the most common symptom prompting consultation. Most sufferers (74{\%} medically diagnosed; 63{\%} undiagnosed) reported alternating constipation and diarrhoea. Previously diagnosed gastrointestinal disorders occurred more often in sufferers than non-sufferers. Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers had more days off work (6.4 vs. 3.0) and days in bed, and reduced activities to a greater extent than non-sufferers. Conclusions: Most (76.6{\%}) irritable bowel syndrome sufferers in the US are undiagnosed. Irritable bowel syndrome has a substantial impact on sufferers' well-being and health, with considerable socioeconomic consequences.",
author = "Hungin, {A. P S} and L. Chang and Locke, {G. R.} and Dennis, {E. H.} and V. Barghout",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2036.2005.02463.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "1365--1375",
journal = "Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics",
issn = "0269-2813",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Irritable bowel syndrome in the United States

T2 - Prevalence, symptom patterns and impact

AU - Hungin, A. P S

AU - Chang, L.

AU - Locke, G. R.

AU - Dennis, E. H.

AU - Barghout, V.

PY - 2005/6/1

Y1 - 2005/6/1

N2 - Background: The impact of irritable bowel syndrome, a gastrointestinal motility disorder, is underestimated and poorly quantified, as clinicians may see only a minority of sufferers. Aim: To determine the prevalence, symptom patterns and impact of irritable bowel syndrome in the US. Methods: This two-phase community survey used quota sampling and random-digit telephone dialling (screening interview) to identify individuals with medically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome or individuals not formally diagnosed, but fulfilling irritable bowel syndrome diagnostic criteria (Manning, Rome I or II). Information on irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, general health status, lifestyle and impact of symptoms on individuals' lives was collected using in-depth follow-up interviews. Data were also collected for healthy controls identified in the screening interviews. Results: The total prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in 5009 screening interviews was 14.1% (medically diagnosed: 3.3%; undiagnosed, but meeting irritable bowel syndrome criteria: 10.8%). Abdominal pain/ discomfort was the most common symptom prompting consultation. Most sufferers (74% medically diagnosed; 63% undiagnosed) reported alternating constipation and diarrhoea. Previously diagnosed gastrointestinal disorders occurred more often in sufferers than non-sufferers. Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers had more days off work (6.4 vs. 3.0) and days in bed, and reduced activities to a greater extent than non-sufferers. Conclusions: Most (76.6%) irritable bowel syndrome sufferers in the US are undiagnosed. Irritable bowel syndrome has a substantial impact on sufferers' well-being and health, with considerable socioeconomic consequences.

AB - Background: The impact of irritable bowel syndrome, a gastrointestinal motility disorder, is underestimated and poorly quantified, as clinicians may see only a minority of sufferers. Aim: To determine the prevalence, symptom patterns and impact of irritable bowel syndrome in the US. Methods: This two-phase community survey used quota sampling and random-digit telephone dialling (screening interview) to identify individuals with medically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome or individuals not formally diagnosed, but fulfilling irritable bowel syndrome diagnostic criteria (Manning, Rome I or II). Information on irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, general health status, lifestyle and impact of symptoms on individuals' lives was collected using in-depth follow-up interviews. Data were also collected for healthy controls identified in the screening interviews. Results: The total prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in 5009 screening interviews was 14.1% (medically diagnosed: 3.3%; undiagnosed, but meeting irritable bowel syndrome criteria: 10.8%). Abdominal pain/ discomfort was the most common symptom prompting consultation. Most sufferers (74% medically diagnosed; 63% undiagnosed) reported alternating constipation and diarrhoea. Previously diagnosed gastrointestinal disorders occurred more often in sufferers than non-sufferers. Irritable bowel syndrome sufferers had more days off work (6.4 vs. 3.0) and days in bed, and reduced activities to a greater extent than non-sufferers. Conclusions: Most (76.6%) irritable bowel syndrome sufferers in the US are undiagnosed. Irritable bowel syndrome has a substantial impact on sufferers' well-being and health, with considerable socioeconomic consequences.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20444464327&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20444464327&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2005.02463.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2005.02463.x

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 1365

EP - 1375

JO - Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

JF - Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

SN - 0269-2813

IS - 11

ER -