Investigation of an interaction of alcohol intake and family history on breast cancer risk in the Minnesota breast cancer family study

Celine M Vachon, James R Cerhan, Robert A. Vierkant, Thomas A. Sellers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. One explanation for the variability in results in studies of alcohol consumption and breast cancer could be the presence of effect modifiers, such as genetic susceptibility. The authors examined the interaction of alcohol and family history of breast cancer on breast cancer risk in a population-based family study of 426 multigenerational breast cancer families. The authors evaluated whether alcohol use was a stronger risk factor for breast cancer among sisters, daughters, nieces, and granddaughters of breast cancer probands than among women who married into these families. METHODS. Analyses were performed on surrogate and self-reported data combined and on self-reported data alone. To evaluate the interaction of alcohol and breast cancer risk among women with a family history of breast cancer, the authors performed analyses on all 426 families and on a subset of 132 families that had 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers in their family. RESULTS. A total of 9032 blood relatives and marry-ins and 558 breast cancer cases were available for analysis. In the entire 426 families, there was a suggestion of an interaction of relationship to the proband and frequency of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk (Pinteraction = 0.14) for surrogate and self-reported information combined. Among first-degree relatives of the proband, daily drinkers had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer compared with never drinkers (RR = 2.45 [1.20, 5.02]), but this increase was less evident among second-degree relatives who reported daily alcohol intake (RR = 1.27 [0.73, 2.22]) and was not evident in marry-ins who reported daily use of alcohol (RR = 0.90 [0.42, 1.90]). The findings based on the subset of 132 high-risk families with 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers were similar to findings based on all 426 families (Pinteraction = 0.07). An interaction of family history with alcohol use was also suggested when the analyses were restricted to self-respondents, although the interaction test P-value was no longer of borderline significance. CONCLUSION. An increased risk of breast cancer due to an increased frequency of alcohol consumption may be limited to women with a family history of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-248
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2001

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Alcohols
Breast Neoplasms
Alcohol Drinking
Ovarian Neoplasms
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Nuclear Family
Siblings

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Breast cancer
  • Family history
  • Genetic susceptibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Investigation of an interaction of alcohol intake and family history on breast cancer risk in the Minnesota breast cancer family study. / Vachon, Celine M; Cerhan, James R; Vierkant, Robert A.; Sellers, Thomas A.

In: Cancer, Vol. 92, No. 2, 15.07.2001, p. 240-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND. One explanation for the variability in results in studies of alcohol consumption and breast cancer could be the presence of effect modifiers, such as genetic susceptibility. The authors examined the interaction of alcohol and family history of breast cancer on breast cancer risk in a population-based family study of 426 multigenerational breast cancer families. The authors evaluated whether alcohol use was a stronger risk factor for breast cancer among sisters, daughters, nieces, and granddaughters of breast cancer probands than among women who married into these families. METHODS. Analyses were performed on surrogate and self-reported data combined and on self-reported data alone. To evaluate the interaction of alcohol and breast cancer risk among women with a family history of breast cancer, the authors performed analyses on all 426 families and on a subset of 132 families that had 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers in their family. RESULTS. A total of 9032 blood relatives and marry-ins and 558 breast cancer cases were available for analysis. In the entire 426 families, there was a suggestion of an interaction of relationship to the proband and frequency of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk (Pinteraction = 0.14) for surrogate and self-reported information combined. Among first-degree relatives of the proband, daily drinkers had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer compared with never drinkers (RR = 2.45 [1.20, 5.02]), but this increase was less evident among second-degree relatives who reported daily alcohol intake (RR = 1.27 [0.73, 2.22]) and was not evident in marry-ins who reported daily use of alcohol (RR = 0.90 [0.42, 1.90]). The findings based on the subset of 132 high-risk families with 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers were similar to findings based on all 426 families (Pinteraction = 0.07). An interaction of family history with alcohol use was also suggested when the analyses were restricted to self-respondents, although the interaction test P-value was no longer of borderline significance. CONCLUSION. An increased risk of breast cancer due to an increased frequency of alcohol consumption may be limited to women with a family history of breast cancer.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND. One explanation for the variability in results in studies of alcohol consumption and breast cancer could be the presence of effect modifiers, such as genetic susceptibility. The authors examined the interaction of alcohol and family history of breast cancer on breast cancer risk in a population-based family study of 426 multigenerational breast cancer families. The authors evaluated whether alcohol use was a stronger risk factor for breast cancer among sisters, daughters, nieces, and granddaughters of breast cancer probands than among women who married into these families. METHODS. Analyses were performed on surrogate and self-reported data combined and on self-reported data alone. To evaluate the interaction of alcohol and breast cancer risk among women with a family history of breast cancer, the authors performed analyses on all 426 families and on a subset of 132 families that had 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers in their family. RESULTS. A total of 9032 blood relatives and marry-ins and 558 breast cancer cases were available for analysis. In the entire 426 families, there was a suggestion of an interaction of relationship to the proband and frequency of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk (Pinteraction = 0.14) for surrogate and self-reported information combined. Among first-degree relatives of the proband, daily drinkers had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer compared with never drinkers (RR = 2.45 [1.20, 5.02]), but this increase was less evident among second-degree relatives who reported daily alcohol intake (RR = 1.27 [0.73, 2.22]) and was not evident in marry-ins who reported daily use of alcohol (RR = 0.90 [0.42, 1.90]). The findings based on the subset of 132 high-risk families with 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers were similar to findings based on all 426 families (Pinteraction = 0.07). An interaction of family history with alcohol use was also suggested when the analyses were restricted to self-respondents, although the interaction test P-value was no longer of borderline significance. CONCLUSION. An increased risk of breast cancer due to an increased frequency of alcohol consumption may be limited to women with a family history of breast cancer.

AB - BACKGROUND. One explanation for the variability in results in studies of alcohol consumption and breast cancer could be the presence of effect modifiers, such as genetic susceptibility. The authors examined the interaction of alcohol and family history of breast cancer on breast cancer risk in a population-based family study of 426 multigenerational breast cancer families. The authors evaluated whether alcohol use was a stronger risk factor for breast cancer among sisters, daughters, nieces, and granddaughters of breast cancer probands than among women who married into these families. METHODS. Analyses were performed on surrogate and self-reported data combined and on self-reported data alone. To evaluate the interaction of alcohol and breast cancer risk among women with a family history of breast cancer, the authors performed analyses on all 426 families and on a subset of 132 families that had 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers in their family. RESULTS. A total of 9032 blood relatives and marry-ins and 558 breast cancer cases were available for analysis. In the entire 426 families, there was a suggestion of an interaction of relationship to the proband and frequency of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk (Pinteraction = 0.14) for surrogate and self-reported information combined. Among first-degree relatives of the proband, daily drinkers had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer compared with never drinkers (RR = 2.45 [1.20, 5.02]), but this increase was less evident among second-degree relatives who reported daily alcohol intake (RR = 1.27 [0.73, 2.22]) and was not evident in marry-ins who reported daily use of alcohol (RR = 0.90 [0.42, 1.90]). The findings based on the subset of 132 high-risk families with 3 or more breast and/or ovarian cancers were similar to findings based on all 426 families (Pinteraction = 0.07). An interaction of family history with alcohol use was also suggested when the analyses were restricted to self-respondents, although the interaction test P-value was no longer of borderline significance. CONCLUSION. An increased risk of breast cancer due to an increased frequency of alcohol consumption may be limited to women with a family history of breast cancer.

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