Investigating four 'myths' surrounding dysphagia in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer. A multi-institutional study from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group

Aminah Jatoi, N. Foster, P. Johnson, G. Klee, J. F. Quevedo, R. F. Morton, S. Nair, C. G. Kardinal, J. A. Mailliard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eighty-five to 95% of esophageal cancer patients suffer dysphagia. Yet, few studies have focused on this symptom, and four 'myths' persist: (i) dysphagia cannot be measured; (ii) chemotherapy cannot palliate it; (iii) dysphagia predicts a poor prognosis; (iv) dysphagia is associated with a frustratingly insatiable appetite. Forty-four patients with metastatic esophageal cancer participated in this quality of life/translational component of a previously reported clinical trial. All were monitored for chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity and completed questionnaires on dysphagia and appetite at baseline and every 6 weeks. The appetite hormones, leptin and neuropeptide y, were also assessed. Forty-five per cent of patients could easily swallow solid foods; all others had varying dysphagia, thus enabling exploration of these four 'myths.' First, a single-item visual analog scale (Swallowing Scale), demonstrated excellent agreement with a previously validated questionnaire (81% at baseline), thus reminding us that dysphagia is measurable. Second, chemotherapy was associated with a trend towards improved dysphagia (P = 0.059). Third, dysphagia did not predict tumor response or survival. Fourth, dysphagia was not associated with appetite, leptin or neuropeptide y. This study helps to dispel these four 'myths' and underscores the need for further quality of life research on dysphagia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-296
Number of pages5
JournalDiseases of the Esophagus
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Esophageal Neoplasms
Deglutition Disorders
Neoplasms
Appetite
Therapeutics
Deglutition
Leptin
Neuropeptides
Drug Therapy
Quality of Life
Visual Analog Scale
Clinical Trials
Hormones
Food
Survival

Keywords

  • Anorexia
  • Dysphagia
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Investigating four 'myths' surrounding dysphagia in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer. A multi-institutional study from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. / Jatoi, Aminah; Foster, N.; Johnson, P.; Klee, G.; Quevedo, J. F.; Morton, R. F.; Nair, S.; Kardinal, C. G.; Mailliard, J. A.

In: Diseases of the Esophagus, Vol. 17, No. 4, 2004, p. 292-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jatoi, Aminah ; Foster, N. ; Johnson, P. ; Klee, G. ; Quevedo, J. F. ; Morton, R. F. ; Nair, S. ; Kardinal, C. G. ; Mailliard, J. A. / Investigating four 'myths' surrounding dysphagia in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer. A multi-institutional study from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. In: Diseases of the Esophagus. 2004 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 292-296.
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