Intravenous Bevacizumab in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia–Related Bleeding and High-Output Cardiac Failure: Significant Inter-Individual Variability in the Need for Maintenance Therapy

Hasan Ahmad Hasan Albitar, Yahya Almodallal, Alice Gallo De Moraes, Erin O'Brien, Garret W. Choby, Rajiv K. Pruthi, Janalee K. Stokken, Patrick S. Kamath, Hector R. Cajigas, Hilary M. DuBrock, Michael J. Krowka, Vivek N. Iyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To present our center's experience with a maintenance treatment algorithm for intravenous bevacizumab that allows for personalized therapy decisions. Patients and Methods: We reviewed all patients treated with intravenous bevacizumab for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia–related bleeding and/or high-output cardiac failure (HOCF) from January 1, 2013, to July 1, 2019, at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Data regarding subsequent bevacizumab dosing were abstracted. Results: A total of 57 patients (n=40, 70.2% females) were identified with a median age of 65 (55 to 74; range, 37 to 89) years. High-cardiac output state was present in 21 patients (36.8%) and 10 (17.5%) were treated with intravenous bevacizumab primarily for HOCF. The median duration of follow-up after completion of the initial intravenous bevacizumab treatment was 25 (12.3 to 40.8; range, 0.1 to 65.4) months. A total of 20 (35.1%) patients with a median follow-up of 13.5 (range, 0 to 48.4) months required no maintenance dosing throughout the duration of follow-up. Among those who required subsequent maintenance doses, only a small fraction (8 patients; 14.0%) required regular maintenance doses every 4 to 8 weeks during follow-up whereas the majority of patients required intermittent “as-needed” doses at varying intervals. Conclusion: There is significant inter-individual variability in the need for maintenance intravenous bevacizumab when patients are followed using a predefined bevacizumab maintenance dosing treatment algorithm. The use of “as-needed” maintenance bevacizumab appears to be an effective strategy for management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia–related bleeding and HOCF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1604-1612
Number of pages9
JournalMayo Clinic proceedings
Volume95
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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