Intratumoral vascular shunting biomarker of clinical outcome and source of circulating tumor cells?

Amy R. Deipolyi, Andrew X. Zhu, Rahmi Oklu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Predicting which patients will benefit from radioembolization remains a challenge, as reliable prognostic indicators are not defined. Abnormal tumor vascular anatomy could not only impact the ability of cancer therapies to penetrate tumors, but may also contribute to a lesion's metastatic potential. Specifically, intratumoral vascular shunts could allow circulating tumor cells to initiate metastases by allowing them to gain access to distant sites in the body, bypassing capillary beds. Here, we describe how tumoral angiogenesis occurs and how intratumoral vascular shunts may form.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)621-626
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Circulating Neoplastic Cells
Blood Vessels
Biomarkers
Neoplasms
Anatomy
Neoplasm Metastasis
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Angiography
  • Radioembolization
  • Shunting
  • SIRT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Intratumoral vascular shunting biomarker of clinical outcome and source of circulating tumor cells? / Deipolyi, Amy R.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Oklu, Rahmi.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 38, No. 6, 2015, p. 621-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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