Intrapartum antibiotic exposure for group B Streptococcus treatment did not increase penicillin allergy in children

Sara M. May, Martha F. Hartz, Avni Y. Joshi, Miguel Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the United States. Intrapartum administration of antibiotics to mothers with positivity to GBS is performed for prevention, with penicillin being the drug of choice. Previous studies have noted an increase in atopic diseases other than drug allergy associated with intrapartum antibiotic exposure. Objective To determine whether intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS increases the likelihood of penicillin allergy in children. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for patients from a birth cohort. The birth cohort included children born in 2007 at a tertiary care hospital and had local addresses. Information on GBS status of the mother, intrapartum antibiotic exposure, delivery mode, and birth order was collected and analyzed. Results Of 927 children identified, 804 were included in the cohort. Eighty children (10%) had a reported penicillin allergy; most were white (79%) and boys (61%). Intrapartum exposure to penicillin (odds ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.45-1.57, P =.59) or to amoxicillin or ampicillin (odds ratio 0.22, 95% confidence interval 0.01-3.71, P =.29) did not increase the risk of penicillin allergy in children. In addition, all other factors evaluated did not affect the risk of penicillin allergy in children. Conclusion To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS treatment and subsequent development of penicillin allergy in the child. In contrast to other atopic diseases, intrapartum antibiotic exposure does not alter the risk of penicillin allergy. Parents and obstetricians should be reassured when using penicillin for prevention of neonatal GBS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-138
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume116
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Streptococcus agalactiae
Penicillins
Hypersensitivity
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Parturition
Confidence Intervals
Drug Hypersensitivity
Birth Order
Amoxicillin
Infant Mortality
Tertiary Healthcare
Ampicillin
Tertiary Care Centers
Parents
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Intrapartum antibiotic exposure for group B Streptococcus treatment did not increase penicillin allergy in children. / May, Sara M.; Hartz, Martha F.; Joshi, Avni Y.; Park, Miguel.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 116, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 134-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the United States. Intrapartum administration of antibiotics to mothers with positivity to GBS is performed for prevention, with penicillin being the drug of choice. Previous studies have noted an increase in atopic diseases other than drug allergy associated with intrapartum antibiotic exposure. Objective To determine whether intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS increases the likelihood of penicillin allergy in children. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for patients from a birth cohort. The birth cohort included children born in 2007 at a tertiary care hospital and had local addresses. Information on GBS status of the mother, intrapartum antibiotic exposure, delivery mode, and birth order was collected and analyzed. Results Of 927 children identified, 804 were included in the cohort. Eighty children (10{\%}) had a reported penicillin allergy; most were white (79{\%}) and boys (61{\%}). Intrapartum exposure to penicillin (odds ratio 0.84, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.45-1.57, P =.59) or to amoxicillin or ampicillin (odds ratio 0.22, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.01-3.71, P =.29) did not increase the risk of penicillin allergy in children. In addition, all other factors evaluated did not affect the risk of penicillin allergy in children. Conclusion To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS treatment and subsequent development of penicillin allergy in the child. In contrast to other atopic diseases, intrapartum antibiotic exposure does not alter the risk of penicillin allergy. Parents and obstetricians should be reassured when using penicillin for prevention of neonatal GBS.",
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AB - Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the United States. Intrapartum administration of antibiotics to mothers with positivity to GBS is performed for prevention, with penicillin being the drug of choice. Previous studies have noted an increase in atopic diseases other than drug allergy associated with intrapartum antibiotic exposure. Objective To determine whether intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS increases the likelihood of penicillin allergy in children. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for patients from a birth cohort. The birth cohort included children born in 2007 at a tertiary care hospital and had local addresses. Information on GBS status of the mother, intrapartum antibiotic exposure, delivery mode, and birth order was collected and analyzed. Results Of 927 children identified, 804 were included in the cohort. Eighty children (10%) had a reported penicillin allergy; most were white (79%) and boys (61%). Intrapartum exposure to penicillin (odds ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.45-1.57, P =.59) or to amoxicillin or ampicillin (odds ratio 0.22, 95% confidence interval 0.01-3.71, P =.29) did not increase the risk of penicillin allergy in children. In addition, all other factors evaluated did not affect the risk of penicillin allergy in children. Conclusion To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS treatment and subsequent development of penicillin allergy in the child. In contrast to other atopic diseases, intrapartum antibiotic exposure does not alter the risk of penicillin allergy. Parents and obstetricians should be reassured when using penicillin for prevention of neonatal GBS.

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