Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in reoperative thyroid and parathyroid surgery

Donald E. Yarbrough, Geoffrey B. Thompson, Jan Kasperbauer, C. Michel Harper, Clive S. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is a rare complication of initial thyroid and parathyroid surgery, but the prevalence is much higher in the reoperative setting. The use of continuous, intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the RLN has been suggested to improve the safety of cervical explorations. Outcomes of a group of reoperative thyroid and parathyroid cases that used EMG monitoring with endoscopically applied hook-wire electrodes were compared with a group of cervical reoperations without monitoring. Office laryngoscopy (indirect or fiberoptic) was used to evaluate and follow suspected RLN complications. Electromyography was used in 52 cervical reexploration procedures. Patients averaged 1.8 previous explorations (range, 1-7 explorations) and underwent procedures for parathyroid (31%) and/or thyroid (77%) disease (overall, 72% malignant). The nonmonitored group had 59 patients with similar characteristics. Only 1 permanent nerve complication in each group was unintended (electromyography, 1.9%; non-electromyography, 1.7%). Seven false-negative and 2 false-positive electromyographic findings occurred. No complications resulted from placement of the electromyography electrodes. Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the RLN in reoperative neck surgery can be performed safely but did not decrease RLN complications in this study. Experience and routine nerve exposure remain crucial to the minimization of RLN complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1115
Number of pages9
JournalSurgery
Volume136
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

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Intraoperative Monitoring
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve
Thyroid Gland
Electromyography
Electrodes
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injuries
Laryngoscopy
Thyroid Diseases
Reoperation
Neck
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in reoperative thyroid and parathyroid surgery. / Yarbrough, Donald E.; Thompson, Geoffrey B.; Kasperbauer, Jan; Harper, C. Michel; Grant, Clive S.

In: Surgery, Vol. 136, No. 6, 01.12.2004, p. 1107-1115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yarbrough, Donald E. ; Thompson, Geoffrey B. ; Kasperbauer, Jan ; Harper, C. Michel ; Grant, Clive S. / Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in reoperative thyroid and parathyroid surgery. In: Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 136, No. 6. pp. 1107-1115.
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