Intranuclear organization of RUNX transcriptional regulatory machinery in biological control of skeletogenesis and cancer

Gary S. Stein, Jane B. Lian, Janet L. Stein, André J. Van Wijnen, Martin Montecino, Jitesh Pratap, Je Choi, S. Kaleem Zaidi, Amjad Javed, Soraya Gutierrez, Kimberly Harrington, Jiali Shen, Daniel Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

RUNX (AML/CBFA/PEBP2) transcription factors serve as paradigms for obligatory relationships between nuclear structure and physiological control of phenotypic gene expression. The RUNX proteins contribute to tissue restricted transcription by sequence-specific binding to promoter elements of target genes and serving as scaffolds for the assembly of coregulatory complexes that mediate biochemical and architectural control of activity. We will present an overview of approaches we are pursuing to address: (1) the involvement of RUNX proteins in governing competency for protein/DNA and protein/protein interactions at promoter regulatory sequences; (2) the recruitment of RUNX factors to subnuclear sites where the machinery for expression or repression of target genes is organized; and (3) the trafficking and integration of regulatory signals that control RUNX-mediated transcription.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-176
Number of pages7
JournalBlood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

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    Stein, G. S., Lian, J. B., Stein, J. L., Van Wijnen, A. J., Montecino, M., Pratap, J., Choi, J., Zaidi, S. K., Javed, A., Gutierrez, S., Harrington, K., Shen, J., & Young, D. (2003). Intranuclear organization of RUNX transcriptional regulatory machinery in biological control of skeletogenesis and cancer. Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases, 30(2), 170-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1079-9796(03)00029-9