Intracranial aneurysms in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion: Management and outcome in 22 cases

Emanuela Crobeddu, Pietro I. D'Urso, Fredric B. Meyer, Giuseppe Lanzino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is little information about clinical characteristics, management, and outcome of patients with intracranial aneurysms and internal carotid artery occlusion. We will describe clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of patients with coexistent internal carotid artery occlusion and intracranial aneurysms. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 22 patients (eight males and 14 females) with coexistent internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion and intracranial aneurysms. Results: This series includes 14 females and eight males with a mean age of 63 years (range, 49 to 80). These patients harbored a total of 35 aneurysms, which were located on the same side of the ICA occlusion in five cases, on the contralateral side in 20 cases, while in ten cases the aneurysm had a midline location (AcomA 9, Basilar tip 1). Treatment consisted of surgery for eight aneurysms and endovascular embolization for 13 aneurysms. No invasive treatment was recommended for 14 aneurysms (eight patients with single aneurysm). No permanent perioperative or periprocedural complications occurred in the selected group of patients undergoing invasive treatment. At a mean follow-up of 57 months (range, 3-203), no patient had a subarachnoid hemorrhage and three patients had died of causes not related to the aneurysm. Conclusion: Surgical and endovascular treatment can be accomplished safely in selected patients with coexistent ICA occlusion and intracranial aneurysms. Conservative treatment is a valid alternative, especially in elderly patients or in patients with very small aneurysms, especially if not located along the collateral pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2001-2007
Number of pages7
JournalActa Neurochirurgica
Volume155
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Intracranial Aneurysm
Internal Carotid Artery
Aneurysm
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Clipping
  • Coil embolization
  • Collateral circulation
  • Internal carotid artery occlusion
  • Intracranial aneurysms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Intracranial aneurysms in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion : Management and outcome in 22 cases. / Crobeddu, Emanuela; D'Urso, Pietro I.; Meyer, Fredric B.; Lanzino, Giuseppe.

In: Acta Neurochirurgica, Vol. 155, No. 11, 11.2013, p. 2001-2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crobeddu, Emanuela ; D'Urso, Pietro I. ; Meyer, Fredric B. ; Lanzino, Giuseppe. / Intracranial aneurysms in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion : Management and outcome in 22 cases. In: Acta Neurochirurgica. 2013 ; Vol. 155, No. 11. pp. 2001-2007.
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