Intracardiac measurement of pre-ejection myocardial velocities estimates the transmural extent of viable myocardium early after reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that wall motion velocity during pre-ejection is proportional to the regional content of viable myocardium after reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). BACKGROUND: Pre-ejection wall motion consists of short and fast inward and outward movement towards and away from the center of the left ventricle (LV) and is altered during regional ischemia. This short-lived event can be accurately quantified by Doppler myocardial imaging (DMI). METHODS: Fourteen open-chest pigs underwent 60 to 120 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The DMI data were collected using a phased-array intracardiac catheter (LV cavity) from ischemic and nonischemic myocardium encompassed within a plane passing through two epicardial bead markers. Peak tissue velocities during isovolumic contraction (IVC) (peak positive and peak negative), ejection (S) and early filling (E) were measured. The cardiac specimen was sliced through the epicardial markers in a plane approximating the ultrasound imaging plane. The transmural extent of necrosis (TEN) (%) was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. RESULTS: During ischemia, positive IVC velocity was zero in ischemic walls with TEN >20%. At reperfusion, positive IVC velocity correlated better with TEN (r = -0.94, p < 0.0001) than it did S (r = -0.70, p < 0.01) and E (r = -0.81, p < 0.01). Differential IVC (the difference between peak positive and peak negative velocity) highly correlated with TEN, during ischemia (r = -0.78, p < 0.001) and during reperfusion (r = -0.93, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: pre-ejection tissue velocity, as measured by intracardiac ultrasound, allows rapid estimation of the transmural extent of viable myocardium after reperfusion for AMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1748-1756
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2001

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Reperfusion
Myocardium
Myocardial Infarction
Necrosis
Ischemia
Heart Ventricles
Cardiac Catheters
Coronary Occlusion
Ultrasonography
Coronary Vessels
Swine
Thorax
Staining and Labeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{90dab5afed9c483fa0105cabafe5db0a,
title = "Intracardiac measurement of pre-ejection myocardial velocities estimates the transmural extent of viable myocardium early after reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that wall motion velocity during pre-ejection is proportional to the regional content of viable myocardium after reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). BACKGROUND: Pre-ejection wall motion consists of short and fast inward and outward movement towards and away from the center of the left ventricle (LV) and is altered during regional ischemia. This short-lived event can be accurately quantified by Doppler myocardial imaging (DMI). METHODS: Fourteen open-chest pigs underwent 60 to 120 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The DMI data were collected using a phased-array intracardiac catheter (LV cavity) from ischemic and nonischemic myocardium encompassed within a plane passing through two epicardial bead markers. Peak tissue velocities during isovolumic contraction (IVC) (peak positive and peak negative), ejection (S) and early filling (E) were measured. The cardiac specimen was sliced through the epicardial markers in a plane approximating the ultrasound imaging plane. The transmural extent of necrosis (TEN) ({\%}) was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. RESULTS: During ischemia, positive IVC velocity was zero in ischemic walls with TEN >20{\%}. At reperfusion, positive IVC velocity correlated better with TEN (r = -0.94, p < 0.0001) than it did S (r = -0.70, p < 0.01) and E (r = -0.81, p < 0.01). Differential IVC (the difference between peak positive and peak negative velocity) highly correlated with TEN, during ischemia (r = -0.78, p < 0.001) and during reperfusion (r = -0.93, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: pre-ejection tissue velocity, as measured by intracardiac ultrasound, allows rapid estimation of the transmural extent of viable myocardium after reperfusion for AMI.",
author = "Pislaru, {Cristina D} and Bruce, {Charles J} and Marek Belohlavek and Seward, {James B.} and Greenleaf, {James F}",
year = "2001",
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day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/S0735-1097(01)01598-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
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journal = "Journal of the American College of Cardiology",
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T1 - Intracardiac measurement of pre-ejection myocardial velocities estimates the transmural extent of viable myocardium early after reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction

AU - Pislaru, Cristina D

AU - Bruce, Charles J

AU - Belohlavek, Marek

AU - Seward, James B.

AU - Greenleaf, James F

PY - 2001/11/15

Y1 - 2001/11/15

N2 - OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that wall motion velocity during pre-ejection is proportional to the regional content of viable myocardium after reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). BACKGROUND: Pre-ejection wall motion consists of short and fast inward and outward movement towards and away from the center of the left ventricle (LV) and is altered during regional ischemia. This short-lived event can be accurately quantified by Doppler myocardial imaging (DMI). METHODS: Fourteen open-chest pigs underwent 60 to 120 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The DMI data were collected using a phased-array intracardiac catheter (LV cavity) from ischemic and nonischemic myocardium encompassed within a plane passing through two epicardial bead markers. Peak tissue velocities during isovolumic contraction (IVC) (peak positive and peak negative), ejection (S) and early filling (E) were measured. The cardiac specimen was sliced through the epicardial markers in a plane approximating the ultrasound imaging plane. The transmural extent of necrosis (TEN) (%) was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. RESULTS: During ischemia, positive IVC velocity was zero in ischemic walls with TEN >20%. At reperfusion, positive IVC velocity correlated better with TEN (r = -0.94, p < 0.0001) than it did S (r = -0.70, p < 0.01) and E (r = -0.81, p < 0.01). Differential IVC (the difference between peak positive and peak negative velocity) highly correlated with TEN, during ischemia (r = -0.78, p < 0.001) and during reperfusion (r = -0.93, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: pre-ejection tissue velocity, as measured by intracardiac ultrasound, allows rapid estimation of the transmural extent of viable myocardium after reperfusion for AMI.

AB - OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that wall motion velocity during pre-ejection is proportional to the regional content of viable myocardium after reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). BACKGROUND: Pre-ejection wall motion consists of short and fast inward and outward movement towards and away from the center of the left ventricle (LV) and is altered during regional ischemia. This short-lived event can be accurately quantified by Doppler myocardial imaging (DMI). METHODS: Fourteen open-chest pigs underwent 60 to 120 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The DMI data were collected using a phased-array intracardiac catheter (LV cavity) from ischemic and nonischemic myocardium encompassed within a plane passing through two epicardial bead markers. Peak tissue velocities during isovolumic contraction (IVC) (peak positive and peak negative), ejection (S) and early filling (E) were measured. The cardiac specimen was sliced through the epicardial markers in a plane approximating the ultrasound imaging plane. The transmural extent of necrosis (TEN) (%) was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. RESULTS: During ischemia, positive IVC velocity was zero in ischemic walls with TEN >20%. At reperfusion, positive IVC velocity correlated better with TEN (r = -0.94, p < 0.0001) than it did S (r = -0.70, p < 0.01) and E (r = -0.81, p < 0.01). Differential IVC (the difference between peak positive and peak negative velocity) highly correlated with TEN, during ischemia (r = -0.78, p < 0.001) and during reperfusion (r = -0.93, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: pre-ejection tissue velocity, as measured by intracardiac ultrasound, allows rapid estimation of the transmural extent of viable myocardium after reperfusion for AMI.

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