Intermittent hypoxemia and OSA: Implications for comorbidities

Naresh A. Dewan, F. Javier Nieto, Virend Somers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OSA is a common chronic disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality including cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurocognitive disease and increased cancer-related deaths. OSA is characterized by recurrent episodes of apneas and hypopneas associated with repetitive episodes of intermittent hypoxemia, intrathoracic pressure changes, and arousals. Intermittent hypoxemia (IH) is now being recognized as a potential major factor contributing to the pathogenesis of OSA-related comorbidities. OSA-related high-frequency IH is characterized by cycles of hypoxemia with reoxygenation that is distinctly different than sustained low-frequency hypoxia and contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Data from both animal and human studies support mechanistic links between IH and its adverse impact at the tissue level. IH promotes oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species and angiogenesis, increased sympathetic activation with BP elevation, and systemic and vascular inflammation with endothelial dysfunction that contributes to diverse multiorgan chronic morbidity and mortality affecting cardiovascular disease, metabolic dysfunction, cognitive decline, and progression of cancer. Data from observational studies in large population groups also support the role for hypoxia in the pathogenesis of OSA comorbidity. Treatment with CPAP to reverse OSA-related symptoms and comorbidities has been shown to provide variable benefit in some but not all patient groups. Early treatment with CPAP makes intuitive sense to promote maximal functional recovery and minimize residual injury. More studies are needed to determine the interacting effects of IH and obesity, differential effects of both short-term and longterm hypoxemia, and the effect of CPAP treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-274
Number of pages9
JournalChest
Volume147
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Comorbidity
Hypoxia
Morbidity
Mortality
Metabolic Diseases
Apnea
Arousal
Reperfusion Injury
Population Groups
Observational Studies
Blood Vessels
Reactive Oxygen Species
Neoplasms
Oxidative Stress
Cardiovascular Diseases
Therapeutics
Obesity
Inflammation
Pressure
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Intermittent hypoxemia and OSA : Implications for comorbidities. / Dewan, Naresh A.; Nieto, F. Javier; Somers, Virend.

In: Chest, Vol. 147, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 266-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dewan, Naresh A. ; Nieto, F. Javier ; Somers, Virend. / Intermittent hypoxemia and OSA : Implications for comorbidities. In: Chest. 2015 ; Vol. 147, No. 1. pp. 266-274.
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