Interaction of dietary folate intake, alcohol, and risk of hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in a prospective study of postmenopausal women

Thomas A. Sellers, Robert A. Vierkant, James R Cerhan, Susan M. Gapstur, Celine M Vachon, Janet E Olson, V. Shane Pankratz, Lawrence H. Kushi, Aaron R. Folsom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Alcohol intake is an established risk factor for breast cancer, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Four recent studies have described interactions of alcohol and low folate intake. We examined this interaction on the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer stratified by tumor receptor status for estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR). The Iowa Women's Health Study is a prospective cohort study of 34,393 at-risk women. Alcohol use and folate intake from diet and supplements were estimated at baseline in 1986 through a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Through 1999, 1,875 cases of breast cancer were identified through linkage to the Iowa Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. Compared with nondrinkers with folate intakes above the 50th percentile, women with low folate and high alcohol were at 1.43-fold greater risk (1.02-2.02). When stratified by tumor receptor status for ER or PR, the risks for low folate/high alcohol were 2.1 (1.18-3.85), 1.0 (0.76-1.42), 1.2 (0.88-1.70), and 1.2 (0.69-2.02) for ER-, ER+, PR+, and PR- tumors, respectively. Because the results were limited primarily to ER- tumors, one plausible interpretation of these data is that alcohol influences breast cancer through its metabolite, acetaldehyde, rather than through effects on ER levels and receptor-mediated pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1107
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume11
Issue number10 I
StatePublished - Oct 2002

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Folic Acid
Alcohols
Hormones
Prospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Estrogen Receptors
Estrogens
Progesterone Receptors
Progesterone
Neoplasms
Acetaldehyde
Women's Health
Registries
Epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diet
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Interaction of dietary folate intake, alcohol, and risk of hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in a prospective study of postmenopausal women. / Sellers, Thomas A.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cerhan, James R; Gapstur, Susan M.; Vachon, Celine M; Olson, Janet E; Pankratz, V. Shane; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Folsom, Aaron R.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 11, No. 10 I, 10.2002, p. 1104-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sellers, Thomas A. ; Vierkant, Robert A. ; Cerhan, James R ; Gapstur, Susan M. ; Vachon, Celine M ; Olson, Janet E ; Pankratz, V. Shane ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; Folsom, Aaron R. / Interaction of dietary folate intake, alcohol, and risk of hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in a prospective study of postmenopausal women. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2002 ; Vol. 11, No. 10 I. pp. 1104-1107.
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