Insights into energy delivery to myocardial tissue during radiofrequency ablation through application of the first law of thermodynamics

T. Jared Bunch, John D. Day, Douglas L Packer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermodynamics of Energy Delivery in Radiofrequency Ablation. The approach to catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation has evolved, and as a consequence, more energy is delivered in the posterior left atrium, exposing neighboring tissue to untoward thermal injury. Simultaneously, catheter technology has advanced to allow more efficient energy delivery into the myocardium, which compounds the likelihood of collateral injury. This review focuses on the basic principles of thermodynamics as they apply to energy delivery during radiofrequency ablation. These principles can be used to titrate energy delivery and plan ablative approaches in an effort to minimize complications during the procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-465
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

Thermodynamics
Catheter Ablation
Wounds and Injuries
Heart Atria
Atrial Fibrillation
Myocardium
Catheters
Hot Temperature
Technology

Keywords

  • Ablation
  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrium
  • Fibrillation
  • Myocardium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Thermodynamics of Energy Delivery in Radiofrequency Ablation. The approach to catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation has evolved, and as a consequence, more energy is delivered in the posterior left atrium, exposing neighboring tissue to untoward thermal injury. Simultaneously, catheter technology has advanced to allow more efficient energy delivery into the myocardium, which compounds the likelihood of collateral injury. This review focuses on the basic principles of thermodynamics as they apply to energy delivery during radiofrequency ablation. These principles can be used to titrate energy delivery and plan ablative approaches in an effort to minimize complications during the procedure.",
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AB - Thermodynamics of Energy Delivery in Radiofrequency Ablation. The approach to catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation has evolved, and as a consequence, more energy is delivered in the posterior left atrium, exposing neighboring tissue to untoward thermal injury. Simultaneously, catheter technology has advanced to allow more efficient energy delivery into the myocardium, which compounds the likelihood of collateral injury. This review focuses on the basic principles of thermodynamics as they apply to energy delivery during radiofrequency ablation. These principles can be used to titrate energy delivery and plan ablative approaches in an effort to minimize complications during the procedure.

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KW - Arrhythmia

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