Inpatient point-of-care bedside glucose testing: Preliminary data on use of connectivity informatics to measure hospital glycemic control

Curtiss B. Cook, Etie Moghissi, Renu Joshi, Gail L. Kongable, Victor J. Abad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Point-of-care (POC) bedside glucose (BG) testing and timely evaluation of its effectiveness are important components of hospital inpatient glycemic control programs. We describe a new technology to evaluate inpatient POC-BG testing and report preliminary results of inpatient glycemic control from 10 U.S. hospitals. Methods: We used the Remote Automated Laboratory System RALS®-Tight Glycemic Control Module (TGCM™) (Medical Automation Systems, Charlottesville, VA) connected to the RALS-Plus to extract and analyze inpatient POC-BG tests from 10 U.S. hospitals for a 3-month period. POC-BG measurements were evaluated in aggregate from all 10 facilities for intensive care unit (ICU), non-ICU, and ICU + non-ICU combined. Results: A total of 742,154 POC-BGs were analyzed. The combined (ICU + non-ICU) mean POC-BG was 159 mg/dL, compared with 146 mg/dL for the ICU and 164 mg/dL for non-ICU. The proportion of hypoglycemic values (<70 mg/dL) was low at 4%, but the percentage of measurements that would be considered hyperglycemic (>180 mg/dL) was high, with more than 30% of values in the non-ICU and 20% in the ICU being elevated. Conclusions: POC-BG data can be captured through automated data management software and can support hospital efforts to evaluate and monitor the status of inpatient glycemic control. These preliminary data suggest that there is a need to conduct broad-based efforts to improve inpatient glucose management. Increasing hospital participation in data collection has the potential to create a national benchmarking process for the development of best practices and improved inpatient hyperglycemia management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-500
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes Technology and Therapeutics
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Point-of-Care Systems
Informatics
Intensive care units
Inpatients
Glucose
Intensive Care Units
Testing
Benchmarking
Automation
Point-of-Care Testing
Practice Guidelines
Hypoglycemic Agents
Hyperglycemia
Information management
Software
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Inpatient point-of-care bedside glucose testing : Preliminary data on use of connectivity informatics to measure hospital glycemic control. / Cook, Curtiss B.; Moghissi, Etie; Joshi, Renu; Kongable, Gail L.; Abad, Victor J.

In: Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, Vol. 9, No. 6, 01.12.2007, p. 493-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cook, Curtiss B. ; Moghissi, Etie ; Joshi, Renu ; Kongable, Gail L. ; Abad, Victor J. / Inpatient point-of-care bedside glucose testing : Preliminary data on use of connectivity informatics to measure hospital glycemic control. In: Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics. 2007 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 493-500.
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