Influence of rotator cuff tearing on glenohumeral stability.

H. C. Hsu, Z. P. Luo, R. H. Cofield, K. N. An

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study hypothesizes that full-thickness tearing of the rotator cuff can lead to joint instability and that the degree of instability depends on the size and location of the tear. Twelve cadaveric shoulder specimens were divided into two groups: group 1 had a circular tear centered at the critical area, and group 2 had a circular tear centered at the rotator interval. Each group was tested at 2.5 cm and 5 cm tear sizes. Unloaded, and with the arm in 90 degrees flexion and full internal rotation, the humeral head shifted posteriorly. With loading, a large and more anteriorly located defect had the most influence on stability. The tear size had the greatest effect on stability in the inferior direction for group 1 and on the anterior direction for group 2. The tear location had the most significant effect on stability in the inferior and anterior directions for the smaller tear and on the anterior direction for a larger tear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-422
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
Volume6
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1997

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Rotator Cuff
Tears
Humeral Head
Joint Instability
Arm
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Influence of rotator cuff tearing on glenohumeral stability. / Hsu, H. C.; Luo, Z. P.; Cofield, R. H.; An, K. N.

In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.], Vol. 6, No. 5, 09.1997, p. 413-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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