Influence of primary payer status on the management and outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in the United States

Saraschandra Vallabhajosyula, Vinayak Kumar, Pranathi R. Sundaragiri, Wisit Cheungpasitporn, Malcolm R. Bell, Mandeep Singh, Allan S. Jaffe, Gregory W. Barsness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background There are limited contemporary data on the influence of primary payer status on the management and outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objective To assess the influence of insurance status on STEMI outcomes. Methods Adult (>18 years) STEMI admissions were identified using the National Inpatient Sample database (2000–2017). Expected primary payer was classified into Medicare, Medicaid, private, uninsured and others. Outcomes of interest included in-hospital mortality, use of coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), hospitalization costs, hospital length of stay and discharge disposition. Results Of the 4,310,703 STEMI admissions, Medicare, Medicaid, private, uninsured and other insurances were noted in 49.0%, 6.3%, 34.4%, 7.2% and 3.1%, respectively. Compared to the others, the Medicare cohort was older (75 vs. 53–57 years), more often female (46% vs. 20–36%), of white race, and with higher comorbidity (all p<0.001). The Medicare and Medicaid population had higher rates of cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest. The Medicare cohort had higher in-hospital mortality (14.2%) compared to the other groups (4.1–6.7%), p<0.001. In a multivariable analysis (Medicare referent), in-hospital mortality was higher in uninsured (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.14 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.11–1.16]), and lower in Medicaid (aOR 0.96 [95% CI 0.94–0.99]; p = 0.002), privately insured (aOR 0.73 [95% CI 0.72–0.75]) and other insurance (aOR 0.91 [95% CI 0.88–0.94]); all p<0.001. Coronary angiography (60% vs. 77–82%) and PCI (45% vs. 63–70%) were used less frequently in the Medicare population compared to others. The Medicare and Medicaid populations had longer lengths of hospital stay, and the Medicare population had the lowest hospitalization costs and fewer discharges to home. Conclusions Compared to other types of primary payers, STEMI admissions with Medicare insurance had lower use of coronary angiography and PCI, and higher in-hospital mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0243810
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number12 December
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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