Influence of coronary heart disease on morbidity and mortality after lower extremity revascularization surgery: A population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota (1970-1987)

Michael E. Farkouh, Charanjit Rihal, Bernard J. Gersh, Thom W Rooke, John W. Hallett, W. Michael O'Fallon, David J. Ballard

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Abstract

Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term postoperative cardiac outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity revascularization surgery in a geographically defined patient group. Background. Among patients with peripheral vascular disease, cardiac events have an important effect on long-term outcome after peripheral vascular surgery. However, long-term outcome is poorly documented. Methods. We examined the entire community medical records of 173 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, who underwent peripheral artery bypass surgery between 1970 and 1987 and were followed up to January 1, 1991. Patients were allocated to subgroups of 60 patients with and 106 patients without overt coronary artery disease. Results. There were no siginificant differences in perioperative death, myocardial infarction or stroke between subgroups at 30 days after operation. The 5- and 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate after operation was 77% and 51% in those without and 54% and 24% in those with overt coronary artery disease (p < 0.001), respectively. For both groups, survival was significantly poorer than that expected for an age- and gender-matched group. Patients undergoing aortoiliac surgery were more likely to be alive at 10 years than those undergoing femoropopliteal surgery (47% vs. 28%, p = 0.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence of cardiac events was greater in those with overt coronary artery disease (10% vs. 28%, p = 0.003). In multivariable analysis, age, coronary artery disease and diabetes were independent predictors of death. Conclusions. Coronary events are the most important cause of long-term morbidity and mortality after peripheral vascular surgery. Patients without overt coronary artery disease are at significant risk for long-term cardiac events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1290-1296
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1994

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Coronary Disease
Lower Extremity
Morbidity
Mortality
Coronary Artery Disease
Population
Blood Vessels
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Medical Records
Research Design
Survival Rate
Arteries
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Survival
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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Influence of coronary heart disease on morbidity and mortality after lower extremity revascularization surgery : A population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota (1970-1987). / Farkouh, Michael E.; Rihal, Charanjit; Gersh, Bernard J.; Rooke, Thom W; Hallett, John W.; O'Fallon, W. Michael; Ballard, David J.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.11.1994, p. 1290-1296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farkouh, Michael E. ; Rihal, Charanjit ; Gersh, Bernard J. ; Rooke, Thom W ; Hallett, John W. ; O'Fallon, W. Michael ; Ballard, David J. / Influence of coronary heart disease on morbidity and mortality after lower extremity revascularization surgery : A population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota (1970-1987). In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 1994 ; Vol. 24, No. 5. pp. 1290-1296.
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abstract = "Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term postoperative cardiac outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity revascularization surgery in a geographically defined patient group. Background. Among patients with peripheral vascular disease, cardiac events have an important effect on long-term outcome after peripheral vascular surgery. However, long-term outcome is poorly documented. Methods. We examined the entire community medical records of 173 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, who underwent peripheral artery bypass surgery between 1970 and 1987 and were followed up to January 1, 1991. Patients were allocated to subgroups of 60 patients with and 106 patients without overt coronary artery disease. Results. There were no siginificant differences in perioperative death, myocardial infarction or stroke between subgroups at 30 days after operation. The 5- and 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate after operation was 77{\%} and 51{\%} in those without and 54{\%} and 24{\%} in those with overt coronary artery disease (p < 0.001), respectively. For both groups, survival was significantly poorer than that expected for an age- and gender-matched group. Patients undergoing aortoiliac surgery were more likely to be alive at 10 years than those undergoing femoropopliteal surgery (47{\%} vs. 28{\%}, p = 0.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence of cardiac events was greater in those with overt coronary artery disease (10{\%} vs. 28{\%}, p = 0.003). In multivariable analysis, age, coronary artery disease and diabetes were independent predictors of death. Conclusions. Coronary events are the most important cause of long-term morbidity and mortality after peripheral vascular surgery. Patients without overt coronary artery disease are at significant risk for long-term cardiac events.",
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T2 - A population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota (1970-1987)

AU - Farkouh, Michael E.

AU - Rihal, Charanjit

AU - Gersh, Bernard J.

AU - Rooke, Thom W

AU - Hallett, John W.

AU - O'Fallon, W. Michael

AU - Ballard, David J.

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N2 - Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term postoperative cardiac outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity revascularization surgery in a geographically defined patient group. Background. Among patients with peripheral vascular disease, cardiac events have an important effect on long-term outcome after peripheral vascular surgery. However, long-term outcome is poorly documented. Methods. We examined the entire community medical records of 173 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, who underwent peripheral artery bypass surgery between 1970 and 1987 and were followed up to January 1, 1991. Patients were allocated to subgroups of 60 patients with and 106 patients without overt coronary artery disease. Results. There were no siginificant differences in perioperative death, myocardial infarction or stroke between subgroups at 30 days after operation. The 5- and 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate after operation was 77% and 51% in those without and 54% and 24% in those with overt coronary artery disease (p < 0.001), respectively. For both groups, survival was significantly poorer than that expected for an age- and gender-matched group. Patients undergoing aortoiliac surgery were more likely to be alive at 10 years than those undergoing femoropopliteal surgery (47% vs. 28%, p = 0.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence of cardiac events was greater in those with overt coronary artery disease (10% vs. 28%, p = 0.003). In multivariable analysis, age, coronary artery disease and diabetes were independent predictors of death. Conclusions. Coronary events are the most important cause of long-term morbidity and mortality after peripheral vascular surgery. Patients without overt coronary artery disease are at significant risk for long-term cardiac events.

AB - Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term postoperative cardiac outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity revascularization surgery in a geographically defined patient group. Background. Among patients with peripheral vascular disease, cardiac events have an important effect on long-term outcome after peripheral vascular surgery. However, long-term outcome is poorly documented. Methods. We examined the entire community medical records of 173 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, who underwent peripheral artery bypass surgery between 1970 and 1987 and were followed up to January 1, 1991. Patients were allocated to subgroups of 60 patients with and 106 patients without overt coronary artery disease. Results. There were no siginificant differences in perioperative death, myocardial infarction or stroke between subgroups at 30 days after operation. The 5- and 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate after operation was 77% and 51% in those without and 54% and 24% in those with overt coronary artery disease (p < 0.001), respectively. For both groups, survival was significantly poorer than that expected for an age- and gender-matched group. Patients undergoing aortoiliac surgery were more likely to be alive at 10 years than those undergoing femoropopliteal surgery (47% vs. 28%, p = 0.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence of cardiac events was greater in those with overt coronary artery disease (10% vs. 28%, p = 0.003). In multivariable analysis, age, coronary artery disease and diabetes were independent predictors of death. Conclusions. Coronary events are the most important cause of long-term morbidity and mortality after peripheral vascular surgery. Patients without overt coronary artery disease are at significant risk for long-term cardiac events.

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