Influence of blood flow occlusion on the development of peripheral and central fatigue during small muscle mass handgrip exercise

R. M. Broxterman, J. C. Craig, J. R. Smith, S. L. Wilcox, C. Jia, S. Warren, T. J. Barstow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The influence of the muscle metabolic milieu on peripheral and central fatigue is currently unclear. Moreover, the relationships between peripheral and central fatigue and the curvature constant (W') have not been investigated. Six men (age: 25 ± 4 years, body mass: 82 ± 10 kg, height: 179 ± 4 cm) completed four constant power handgrip tests to exhaustion under conditions of control exercise (Con), blood flow occlusion exercise (Occ), Con with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Con + Occ), and Occ with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Occ + Occ). Neuromuscular fatigue measurements and W' were obtained for each subject. Each trial resulted in significant peripheral and central fatigue. Significantly greater peripheral (79.7 ± 5.1% vs. 22.7 ± 6.0%) and central (42.6 ± 3.9% vs. 4.9 ± 2.0%) fatigue occurred for Occ than for Con. In addition, significantly greater peripheral (83.0 ± 4.2% vs. 69.0 ± 6.2%) and central (65.5 ± 14.6% vs. 18.6 ± 4.1%) fatigue occurred for Occ + Occ than for Con + Occ. W' was significantly related to the magnitude of global (r = 0.91) and peripheral (r = 0.83) fatigue. The current findings demonstrate that blood flow occlusion exacerbated the development of both peripheral and central fatigue and that post-exercise blood flow occlusion prevented the recovery of both peripheral and central fatigue. Moreover, the current findings suggest that W' may be determined by the magnitude of fatigue accrued during exercise. Journal compilation

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4043-4054
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume593
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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