Induction of sensitivity to doxorubin and etoposide by transfection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with here β-2

Lyndsay N. Harris, Li Yang, Careen Tang, Dajun Yang, Ruth Lupu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

HER2 (erbB-2) proto-oncogene amplification and/or overexpression correlate with poor prognosis in many malignancies. The precise biological role of this oncogenic signaling pathway (which also involves the HER4 gene) in breast cancer is unclear. One property conferred by this oncogene relates to response to drug therapy. Clinical studies support an association between HER2 overexpression and resistance to alkylating agents (cisplatinum and cyclophosphamide). Data from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B 8869/8541 study indicate enhanced dose responsiveness to doxorubicin (Adriamycin) in patients who overexpress the HER2 receptor. Heregulin β-2, a naturally occurring ligand that activates the HER2 receptor by inducing its heterodimerization with the HER4 receptor, has recently been cloned. The ability of this ligand to phosphorylate the HER2 receptor exogenously allows us to study the effect of HER2 activation on cancer cell behavior. To study the relationship between chemotherapy response and activation of HER2, MCF-7 cells expressing biologically active heregulin were assessed for response to doxorubicin and etoposide, both of which are topoisomerase Ha (topo IIα) inhibitors. Several clones show markedly increased sensitivity to these drugs. In addition, the same wild-type MCF-7 cells transfected with heregulin β-2 under the control of an inducible promoter also show this dose-response relationship to doxorubicin after the expression of heregulin β-2 is activated by zinc. The modulation of topo Hot was studied in the cell lines transfected with heregulin. topo Hot mRNA and protein (total protein and enzymatic decatenating activity) were found to be up-regulated in heregulin β-2- transfected cells. Moreover, topo Hot promoter activity was also modestly increased in heregulin β-2-transfected cells. Because up-regulation of topo Hot in vitro and in clinical specimens is associated with increased response to doxorubicin (presumptively by an increase in drug substrate), this may be the mechanism of the increased sensitivity to doxorubicin seen in heregulin β-2-transfected cells. This implies that activation of HER2 or one of the other members of the receptor family may increase sensitivity to doxorubicin by up-regulation of topo IIα. This finding suggests the use of receptor/ligand expression to direct patient-specific therapeutic choices (e.g., doxorubicin versus alkylator-based regimens) and the use of biological agents (such as heregulin) in combination with certain chemotherapeutic agents to enhance response to treatment in breast cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1005-1012
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuregulin-1
Etoposide
Transfection
Doxorubicin
Breast Neoplasms
Alkylating Agents
MCF-7 Cells
Ligands
Up-Regulation
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Aptitude
Proto-Oncogenes
Biological Factors
Oncogenes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cyclophosphamide
Zinc
Leukemia
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Induction of sensitivity to doxorubin and etoposide by transfection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with here β-2. / Harris, Lyndsay N.; Yang, Li; Tang, Careen; Yang, Dajun; Lupu, Ruth.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 4, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 1005-1012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, Lyndsay N. ; Yang, Li ; Tang, Careen ; Yang, Dajun ; Lupu, Ruth. / Induction of sensitivity to doxorubin and etoposide by transfection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with here β-2. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 1998 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 1005-1012.
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