Increased left atrial volume index: potent biomarker for first-ever ischemic stroke

Kaniz Fatema, Kent R Bailey, George W. Petty, Irene Meissner, Martin Osranek, Ahmed A. Alsaileek, Bijoy K. Khandheria, Teresa S. Tsang, James B. Seward

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To establish the incidence and correlation of increased left atrial volume index (LAVI) in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Using our institution's epidemiological database, we defined a cohort of 432 patients (cases) who underwent transthoracic echocardiography within 60 days of first ischemic stroke between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1994. Left atrial volume was measured with the biplane area-length method, indexed to body surface area (LAVI, expressed as mL/m 2). The control group consisted of 416 community residents who underwent transthoracic echocardiography as participants in a stroke risk factor study. Increased LAVI was defined as 28 mL/m2 or higher. Survival in patients was compared with expected survival among white Minnesotans and was further modeled as a function of age, sex, LAVI, and clinical risk factors. RESULTS: Among the included 306 patients, 230 (75%) had increased LAVI (mean ± SD, 49±21 mL/m2). Patients with increased LAVI were older than those with normal LAVI (mean ± SD age, 76±11 vs 71±13 years; P=.003) and had more cardiovascular risk factors (mean ± SD number, 1.8±0.07 vs 1.3±0.89; P<.001). Mean LAVI was higher in cases than in age- and sex-matched controls ( P<.001). At 5-year follow-up, cases showed excess mortality compared with age-matched controls ( P=.001). After variables were adjusted for age, sex, and clinical risk factors, LAVI was independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: A useful index for prediction of adverse cardiovascular events, LAVI might also predict first ischemic stroke and subsequent mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1114
Number of pages8
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume83
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

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Biomarkers
Stroke
Echocardiography
Mortality
Survival
Body Surface Area
Databases
Control Groups
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Increased left atrial volume index : potent biomarker for first-ever ischemic stroke. / Fatema, Kaniz; Bailey, Kent R; Petty, George W.; Meissner, Irene; Osranek, Martin; Alsaileek, Ahmed A.; Khandheria, Bijoy K.; Tsang, Teresa S.; Seward, James B.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 83, No. 10, 2008, p. 1107-1114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fatema, K, Bailey, KR, Petty, GW, Meissner, I, Osranek, M, Alsaileek, AA, Khandheria, BK, Tsang, TS & Seward, JB 2008, 'Increased left atrial volume index: potent biomarker for first-ever ischemic stroke', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 83, no. 10, pp. 1107-1114. https://doi.org/10.4065/83.10.1107
Fatema, Kaniz ; Bailey, Kent R ; Petty, George W. ; Meissner, Irene ; Osranek, Martin ; Alsaileek, Ahmed A. ; Khandheria, Bijoy K. ; Tsang, Teresa S. ; Seward, James B. / Increased left atrial volume index : potent biomarker for first-ever ischemic stroke. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2008 ; Vol. 83, No. 10. pp. 1107-1114.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To establish the incidence and correlation of increased left atrial volume index (LAVI) in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Using our institution's epidemiological database, we defined a cohort of 432 patients (cases) who underwent transthoracic echocardiography within 60 days of first ischemic stroke between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1994. Left atrial volume was measured with the biplane area-length method, indexed to body surface area (LAVI, expressed as mL/m 2). The control group consisted of 416 community residents who underwent transthoracic echocardiography as participants in a stroke risk factor study. Increased LAVI was defined as 28 mL/m2 or higher. Survival in patients was compared with expected survival among white Minnesotans and was further modeled as a function of age, sex, LAVI, and clinical risk factors. RESULTS: Among the included 306 patients, 230 (75{\%}) had increased LAVI (mean ± SD, 49±21 mL/m2). Patients with increased LAVI were older than those with normal LAVI (mean ± SD age, 76±11 vs 71±13 years; P=.003) and had more cardiovascular risk factors (mean ± SD number, 1.8±0.07 vs 1.3±0.89; P<.001). Mean LAVI was higher in cases than in age- and sex-matched controls ( P<.001). At 5-year follow-up, cases showed excess mortality compared with age-matched controls ( P=.001). After variables were adjusted for age, sex, and clinical risk factors, LAVI was independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: A useful index for prediction of adverse cardiovascular events, LAVI might also predict first ischemic stroke and subsequent mortality.",
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T2 - potent biomarker for first-ever ischemic stroke

AU - Fatema, Kaniz

AU - Bailey, Kent R

AU - Petty, George W.

AU - Meissner, Irene

AU - Osranek, Martin

AU - Alsaileek, Ahmed A.

AU - Khandheria, Bijoy K.

AU - Tsang, Teresa S.

AU - Seward, James B.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To establish the incidence and correlation of increased left atrial volume index (LAVI) in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Using our institution's epidemiological database, we defined a cohort of 432 patients (cases) who underwent transthoracic echocardiography within 60 days of first ischemic stroke between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1994. Left atrial volume was measured with the biplane area-length method, indexed to body surface area (LAVI, expressed as mL/m 2). The control group consisted of 416 community residents who underwent transthoracic echocardiography as participants in a stroke risk factor study. Increased LAVI was defined as 28 mL/m2 or higher. Survival in patients was compared with expected survival among white Minnesotans and was further modeled as a function of age, sex, LAVI, and clinical risk factors. RESULTS: Among the included 306 patients, 230 (75%) had increased LAVI (mean ± SD, 49±21 mL/m2). Patients with increased LAVI were older than those with normal LAVI (mean ± SD age, 76±11 vs 71±13 years; P=.003) and had more cardiovascular risk factors (mean ± SD number, 1.8±0.07 vs 1.3±0.89; P<.001). Mean LAVI was higher in cases than in age- and sex-matched controls ( P<.001). At 5-year follow-up, cases showed excess mortality compared with age-matched controls ( P=.001). After variables were adjusted for age, sex, and clinical risk factors, LAVI was independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: A useful index for prediction of adverse cardiovascular events, LAVI might also predict first ischemic stroke and subsequent mortality.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To establish the incidence and correlation of increased left atrial volume index (LAVI) in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Using our institution's epidemiological database, we defined a cohort of 432 patients (cases) who underwent transthoracic echocardiography within 60 days of first ischemic stroke between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1994. Left atrial volume was measured with the biplane area-length method, indexed to body surface area (LAVI, expressed as mL/m 2). The control group consisted of 416 community residents who underwent transthoracic echocardiography as participants in a stroke risk factor study. Increased LAVI was defined as 28 mL/m2 or higher. Survival in patients was compared with expected survival among white Minnesotans and was further modeled as a function of age, sex, LAVI, and clinical risk factors. RESULTS: Among the included 306 patients, 230 (75%) had increased LAVI (mean ± SD, 49±21 mL/m2). Patients with increased LAVI were older than those with normal LAVI (mean ± SD age, 76±11 vs 71±13 years; P=.003) and had more cardiovascular risk factors (mean ± SD number, 1.8±0.07 vs 1.3±0.89; P<.001). Mean LAVI was higher in cases than in age- and sex-matched controls ( P<.001). At 5-year follow-up, cases showed excess mortality compared with age-matched controls ( P=.001). After variables were adjusted for age, sex, and clinical risk factors, LAVI was independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: A useful index for prediction of adverse cardiovascular events, LAVI might also predict first ischemic stroke and subsequent mortality.

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