Increased endoneurial fluid pressure in experimental lead neuropathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors' study provides the first evidence that endoneurial pressure is increased in a neuropathy. The rise in EFP in experimental lead neuropathy is small in absolute terms and relative to the externally applied pressures which have been used to produce segmental demyelination, however, the relative increase above baseline values is considerable. The mean EFP after 6 wk of lead feeding is approximately 4 times and at 3 mth 6 times baseline values. Moreover, the mode of action of experimental compression is mechanical and acute, compression being applied for minutes to an hour or 2, whereas the pressure rise in experimental lead neuropathy as reported here is maintained over months. The magnitude of the increase in pressure is not sufficient to collapse endoneurial and perineurial capilaries so that ischaemia from capillary collapse, as was postulated by Sunderland for median nerve entrapment in man, should not be the mechanism of segmental demyelination in this model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-428
Number of pages2
JournalNature
Volume269
Issue number5627
StatePublished - 1977

Fingerprint

Pressure
Demyelinating Diseases
Nerve Compression Syndromes
Median Nerve
Ischemia
Lead

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Increased endoneurial fluid pressure in experimental lead neuropathy. / Low, Phillip Anson; Dyck, Peter J.

In: Nature, Vol. 269, No. 5627, 1977, p. 427-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2e10c2feea5142b2aeef9d636373d7d6,
title = "Increased endoneurial fluid pressure in experimental lead neuropathy",
abstract = "The authors' study provides the first evidence that endoneurial pressure is increased in a neuropathy. The rise in EFP in experimental lead neuropathy is small in absolute terms and relative to the externally applied pressures which have been used to produce segmental demyelination, however, the relative increase above baseline values is considerable. The mean EFP after 6 wk of lead feeding is approximately 4 times and at 3 mth 6 times baseline values. Moreover, the mode of action of experimental compression is mechanical and acute, compression being applied for minutes to an hour or 2, whereas the pressure rise in experimental lead neuropathy as reported here is maintained over months. The magnitude of the increase in pressure is not sufficient to collapse endoneurial and perineurial capilaries so that ischaemia from capillary collapse, as was postulated by Sunderland for median nerve entrapment in man, should not be the mechanism of segmental demyelination in this model.",
author = "Low, {Phillip Anson} and Dyck, {Peter J}",
year = "1977",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "269",
pages = "427--428",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5627",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased endoneurial fluid pressure in experimental lead neuropathy

AU - Low, Phillip Anson

AU - Dyck, Peter J

PY - 1977

Y1 - 1977

N2 - The authors' study provides the first evidence that endoneurial pressure is increased in a neuropathy. The rise in EFP in experimental lead neuropathy is small in absolute terms and relative to the externally applied pressures which have been used to produce segmental demyelination, however, the relative increase above baseline values is considerable. The mean EFP after 6 wk of lead feeding is approximately 4 times and at 3 mth 6 times baseline values. Moreover, the mode of action of experimental compression is mechanical and acute, compression being applied for minutes to an hour or 2, whereas the pressure rise in experimental lead neuropathy as reported here is maintained over months. The magnitude of the increase in pressure is not sufficient to collapse endoneurial and perineurial capilaries so that ischaemia from capillary collapse, as was postulated by Sunderland for median nerve entrapment in man, should not be the mechanism of segmental demyelination in this model.

AB - The authors' study provides the first evidence that endoneurial pressure is increased in a neuropathy. The rise in EFP in experimental lead neuropathy is small in absolute terms and relative to the externally applied pressures which have been used to produce segmental demyelination, however, the relative increase above baseline values is considerable. The mean EFP after 6 wk of lead feeding is approximately 4 times and at 3 mth 6 times baseline values. Moreover, the mode of action of experimental compression is mechanical and acute, compression being applied for minutes to an hour or 2, whereas the pressure rise in experimental lead neuropathy as reported here is maintained over months. The magnitude of the increase in pressure is not sufficient to collapse endoneurial and perineurial capilaries so that ischaemia from capillary collapse, as was postulated by Sunderland for median nerve entrapment in man, should not be the mechanism of segmental demyelination in this model.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017651521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017651521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 909590

AN - SCOPUS:0017651521

VL - 269

SP - 427

EP - 428

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 5627

ER -