Incorporation of integrative medicine education into undergraduate medical education: a longitudinal study

Saswati Mahapatra, Anjali Bhagra, Bisrat Fekadu, Zhuo Li, Brent A Bauer, Dietlind L. Wahner-Roedler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Integrative medicine (IM) combines complementary medical approaches into conventional medicine and considers the whole person. We implemented a longitudinal IM short-course curriculum into our medical school education. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of the curriculum via knowledge and attitude surveys regarding IM among students.

METHODS: A mandatory short IM curriculum across all years of medical school was created and taught by IM professionals and physician faculty members with expertise in integrative therapies. Graduating classes of 2015 and 2016 completed the same survey in their first and third years of medical school. Paired data analysis was done, and only students who completed surveys at both time points were included in final analyses.

RESULTS: Of 52 students in each class, 17 (33%) in the class of 2015 and 22 (42%) in the class of 2016 completed both surveys. After the IM curriculum, students' knowledge of and comfort with several IM therapies-biofeedback, mindfulness, and the use of St. John's wort-improved significantly. Students' personal health practices also improved, including better sleep, exercise, and stress management for the class of 2015. Students graduating in 2016 reported decreased alcohol use in their third year compared with their first year.

CONCLUSION: It is feasible to incorporate IM education into undergraduate medical education, and this is associated with improvement in students' knowledge of IM and personal health practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-449
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of integrative medicine
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Integrative Medicine
Undergraduate Medical Education
Longitudinal Studies
Education
Students
Curriculum
Medical Schools
Hypericum
Mindfulness
Health
Medical Education
Sleep
Alcohols
Medicine
Exercise
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Incorporation of integrative medicine education into undergraduate medical education : a longitudinal study. / Mahapatra, Saswati; Bhagra, Anjali; Fekadu, Bisrat; Li, Zhuo; Bauer, Brent A; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.

In: Journal of integrative medicine, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 442-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mahapatra, Saswati ; Bhagra, Anjali ; Fekadu, Bisrat ; Li, Zhuo ; Bauer, Brent A ; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L. / Incorporation of integrative medicine education into undergraduate medical education : a longitudinal study. In: Journal of integrative medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 442-449.
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