Incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia: A Population-Based Study

Majdi N. Al-Hasan, John W. Wilson, Brian D. Lahr, Jeanette E Eckel-Passow, Larry M. Baddour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia has not been defined in a population-based investigation. Methods: We performed a retrospective, population-based incidence study using resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project of Olmsted County, Minnesota. We identified all Olmsted County residents with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006, by microbiology records in the only 2 laboratories in the county. Medical records were reviewed to confirm diagnosis, residency status, and clinical characteristics. Results: Age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 person-years was 10.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-14.0) in men and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.2-5.2) in women for total P. aeruginosa bacteremia, and 8.4 (95% CI, 5.5-11.2) in men and 2.5 (95% CI, 1.3-3.8) in women for monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia. There was no significant change in incidence of total P. aeruginosa bacteremia during the past decade (P = .418). Incidence increased exponentially with age, with a greater magnitude of increase in men compared with women for total and monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia (P = .007 and P = .015, respectively). In patients with monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia, the median age was 69 years, and 78.4% of cases were either nosocomial or health care associated. Most patients had multiple comorbid conditions. The urinary tract was the most common primary source of infection. The 28-day all-cause mortality of monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia was 25.5%. In vitro susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was 95.3%. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first population-based incidence study of P. aeruginosa bacteremia. The incidence of P. aeruginosa bacteremia has remained stable during the past decade. Fluoroquinolone susceptibility is high among local P. aeruginosa bacteremia isolates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)702-708
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume121
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacteremia
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Incidence
Population
Confidence Intervals
Cohort Studies
Fluoroquinolones
Ciprofloxacin
Internship and Residency
Microbiology
Urinary Tract
Medical Records
Epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care
Mortality

Keywords

  • Antibiotic susceptibility
  • Bacteremia
  • Epidemiology
  • Mortality
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia : A Population-Based Study. / Al-Hasan, Majdi N.; Wilson, John W.; Lahr, Brian D.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Baddour, Larry M.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 121, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 702-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Hasan, Majdi N. ; Wilson, John W. ; Lahr, Brian D. ; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E ; Baddour, Larry M. / Incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia : A Population-Based Study. In: American Journal of Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 121, No. 8. pp. 702-708.
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abstract = "Background: The incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia has not been defined in a population-based investigation. Methods: We performed a retrospective, population-based incidence study using resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project of Olmsted County, Minnesota. We identified all Olmsted County residents with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006, by microbiology records in the only 2 laboratories in the county. Medical records were reviewed to confirm diagnosis, residency status, and clinical characteristics. Results: Age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 person-years was 10.8 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 7.5-14.0) in men and 3.7 (95{\%} CI, 2.2-5.2) in women for total P. aeruginosa bacteremia, and 8.4 (95{\%} CI, 5.5-11.2) in men and 2.5 (95{\%} CI, 1.3-3.8) in women for monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia. There was no significant change in incidence of total P. aeruginosa bacteremia during the past decade (P = .418). Incidence increased exponentially with age, with a greater magnitude of increase in men compared with women for total and monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia (P = .007 and P = .015, respectively). In patients with monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia, the median age was 69 years, and 78.4{\%} of cases were either nosocomial or health care associated. Most patients had multiple comorbid conditions. The urinary tract was the most common primary source of infection. The 28-day all-cause mortality of monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia was 25.5{\%}. In vitro susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was 95.3{\%}. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first population-based incidence study of P. aeruginosa bacteremia. The incidence of P. aeruginosa bacteremia has remained stable during the past decade. Fluoroquinolone susceptibility is high among local P. aeruginosa bacteremia isolates.",
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T1 - Incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia

T2 - A Population-Based Study

AU - Al-Hasan, Majdi N.

AU - Wilson, John W.

AU - Lahr, Brian D.

AU - Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E

AU - Baddour, Larry M.

PY - 2008/8

Y1 - 2008/8

N2 - Background: The incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia has not been defined in a population-based investigation. Methods: We performed a retrospective, population-based incidence study using resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project of Olmsted County, Minnesota. We identified all Olmsted County residents with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006, by microbiology records in the only 2 laboratories in the county. Medical records were reviewed to confirm diagnosis, residency status, and clinical characteristics. Results: Age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 person-years was 10.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-14.0) in men and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.2-5.2) in women for total P. aeruginosa bacteremia, and 8.4 (95% CI, 5.5-11.2) in men and 2.5 (95% CI, 1.3-3.8) in women for monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia. There was no significant change in incidence of total P. aeruginosa bacteremia during the past decade (P = .418). Incidence increased exponentially with age, with a greater magnitude of increase in men compared with women for total and monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia (P = .007 and P = .015, respectively). In patients with monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia, the median age was 69 years, and 78.4% of cases were either nosocomial or health care associated. Most patients had multiple comorbid conditions. The urinary tract was the most common primary source of infection. The 28-day all-cause mortality of monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia was 25.5%. In vitro susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was 95.3%. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first population-based incidence study of P. aeruginosa bacteremia. The incidence of P. aeruginosa bacteremia has remained stable during the past decade. Fluoroquinolone susceptibility is high among local P. aeruginosa bacteremia isolates.

AB - Background: The incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia has not been defined in a population-based investigation. Methods: We performed a retrospective, population-based incidence study using resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project of Olmsted County, Minnesota. We identified all Olmsted County residents with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006, by microbiology records in the only 2 laboratories in the county. Medical records were reviewed to confirm diagnosis, residency status, and clinical characteristics. Results: Age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 person-years was 10.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-14.0) in men and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.2-5.2) in women for total P. aeruginosa bacteremia, and 8.4 (95% CI, 5.5-11.2) in men and 2.5 (95% CI, 1.3-3.8) in women for monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia. There was no significant change in incidence of total P. aeruginosa bacteremia during the past decade (P = .418). Incidence increased exponentially with age, with a greater magnitude of increase in men compared with women for total and monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia (P = .007 and P = .015, respectively). In patients with monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia, the median age was 69 years, and 78.4% of cases were either nosocomial or health care associated. Most patients had multiple comorbid conditions. The urinary tract was the most common primary source of infection. The 28-day all-cause mortality of monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia was 25.5%. In vitro susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was 95.3%. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first population-based incidence study of P. aeruginosa bacteremia. The incidence of P. aeruginosa bacteremia has remained stable during the past decade. Fluoroquinolone susceptibility is high among local P. aeruginosa bacteremia isolates.

KW - Antibiotic susceptibility

KW - Bacteremia

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Mortality

KW - Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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