Incidence of gadolinium or fluid signal within surgically proven glenoid labral tears at MR arthrography

Nicholas C. Nacey, Michael Fox, Christopher J. Bertozzi, Jennifer L. Pierce, Nicholas Said, David R. Diduch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine how often patients with surgically proven labral tears have labral signal on shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) that is not equal to gadolinium or fluid on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients with surgical repair of a SLAP or Bankart labral tear within 95 days of an MRA were included. Using cartilage signal as an internal reference, two musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists retrospectively categorized labral signal as T1-hyperintense, T1-gadolinium, T2-hyperintense, or T2-fluid. In patients without T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal, secondary findings such as the orientation, extent, shape, and width of the abnormal signal was recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: Sixty-one labral tears (36 SLAP and 25 Bankart) in 54 patients (mean age, 30.7; F:M 8:46) met the inclusion criteria. In 67% and 76% of SLAP and Bankart labral tears, T1-gadolinium signal was present (p = 0.43). T2-fluid signal was present in 50% and 92% of these same labral tears (p = 0.001). The absence of T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid signal was more common in SLAP tears (33%) compared to Bankart tears (8%) (p = 0.02). In the SLAP cases, at least two secondary findings of a SLAP tear were present in 92% (11/12). Conclusions: Lack of surfacing T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal is unusual in Bankart tears but relatively common in SLAP tears. However, a SLAP tear was diagnosed in 92% of these 12 cases when two secondary findings were present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSkeletal Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Arthrography
Gadolinium
Incidence
Tears
Cartilage
Rotator Cuff Injuries
Analysis of Variance
Shoulder Injuries
Bankart Lesions

Keywords

  • Bankart
  • Labrum
  • MR arthrography
  • MRI
  • SLAP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Incidence of gadolinium or fluid signal within surgically proven glenoid labral tears at MR arthrography. / Nacey, Nicholas C.; Fox, Michael; Bertozzi, Christopher J.; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Said, Nicholas; Diduch, David R.

In: Skeletal Radiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nacey, Nicholas C. ; Fox, Michael ; Bertozzi, Christopher J. ; Pierce, Jennifer L. ; Said, Nicholas ; Diduch, David R. / Incidence of gadolinium or fluid signal within surgically proven glenoid labral tears at MR arthrography. In: Skeletal Radiology. 2019.
@article{db5d9f77f7b747d8a3a2bfac81e7c244,
title = "Incidence of gadolinium or fluid signal within surgically proven glenoid labral tears at MR arthrography",
abstract = "Objective: To determine how often patients with surgically proven labral tears have labral signal on shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) that is not equal to gadolinium or fluid on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients with surgical repair of a SLAP or Bankart labral tear within 95 days of an MRA were included. Using cartilage signal as an internal reference, two musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists retrospectively categorized labral signal as T1-hyperintense, T1-gadolinium, T2-hyperintense, or T2-fluid. In patients without T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal, secondary findings such as the orientation, extent, shape, and width of the abnormal signal was recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: Sixty-one labral tears (36 SLAP and 25 Bankart) in 54 patients (mean age, 30.7; F:M 8:46) met the inclusion criteria. In 67{\%} and 76{\%} of SLAP and Bankart labral tears, T1-gadolinium signal was present (p = 0.43). T2-fluid signal was present in 50{\%} and 92{\%} of these same labral tears (p = 0.001). The absence of T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid signal was more common in SLAP tears (33{\%}) compared to Bankart tears (8{\%}) (p = 0.02). In the SLAP cases, at least two secondary findings of a SLAP tear were present in 92{\%} (11/12). Conclusions: Lack of surfacing T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal is unusual in Bankart tears but relatively common in SLAP tears. However, a SLAP tear was diagnosed in 92{\%} of these 12 cases when two secondary findings were present.",
keywords = "Bankart, Labrum, MR arthrography, MRI, SLAP",
author = "Nacey, {Nicholas C.} and Michael Fox and Bertozzi, {Christopher J.} and Pierce, {Jennifer L.} and Nicholas Said and Diduch, {David R.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00256-018-3143-x",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Skeletal Radiology",
issn = "0364-2348",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidence of gadolinium or fluid signal within surgically proven glenoid labral tears at MR arthrography

AU - Nacey, Nicholas C.

AU - Fox, Michael

AU - Bertozzi, Christopher J.

AU - Pierce, Jennifer L.

AU - Said, Nicholas

AU - Diduch, David R.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: To determine how often patients with surgically proven labral tears have labral signal on shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) that is not equal to gadolinium or fluid on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients with surgical repair of a SLAP or Bankart labral tear within 95 days of an MRA were included. Using cartilage signal as an internal reference, two musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists retrospectively categorized labral signal as T1-hyperintense, T1-gadolinium, T2-hyperintense, or T2-fluid. In patients without T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal, secondary findings such as the orientation, extent, shape, and width of the abnormal signal was recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: Sixty-one labral tears (36 SLAP and 25 Bankart) in 54 patients (mean age, 30.7; F:M 8:46) met the inclusion criteria. In 67% and 76% of SLAP and Bankart labral tears, T1-gadolinium signal was present (p = 0.43). T2-fluid signal was present in 50% and 92% of these same labral tears (p = 0.001). The absence of T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid signal was more common in SLAP tears (33%) compared to Bankart tears (8%) (p = 0.02). In the SLAP cases, at least two secondary findings of a SLAP tear were present in 92% (11/12). Conclusions: Lack of surfacing T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal is unusual in Bankart tears but relatively common in SLAP tears. However, a SLAP tear was diagnosed in 92% of these 12 cases when two secondary findings were present.

AB - Objective: To determine how often patients with surgically proven labral tears have labral signal on shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) that is not equal to gadolinium or fluid on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients with surgical repair of a SLAP or Bankart labral tear within 95 days of an MRA were included. Using cartilage signal as an internal reference, two musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists retrospectively categorized labral signal as T1-hyperintense, T1-gadolinium, T2-hyperintense, or T2-fluid. In patients without T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal, secondary findings such as the orientation, extent, shape, and width of the abnormal signal was recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: Sixty-one labral tears (36 SLAP and 25 Bankart) in 54 patients (mean age, 30.7; F:M 8:46) met the inclusion criteria. In 67% and 76% of SLAP and Bankart labral tears, T1-gadolinium signal was present (p = 0.43). T2-fluid signal was present in 50% and 92% of these same labral tears (p = 0.001). The absence of T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid signal was more common in SLAP tears (33%) compared to Bankart tears (8%) (p = 0.02). In the SLAP cases, at least two secondary findings of a SLAP tear were present in 92% (11/12). Conclusions: Lack of surfacing T1-gadolinium or T2-fluid labral signal is unusual in Bankart tears but relatively common in SLAP tears. However, a SLAP tear was diagnosed in 92% of these 12 cases when two secondary findings were present.

KW - Bankart

KW - Labrum

KW - MR arthrography

KW - MRI

KW - SLAP

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060656503&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060656503&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00256-018-3143-x

DO - 10.1007/s00256-018-3143-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 30683975

AN - SCOPUS:85060656503

JO - Skeletal Radiology

JF - Skeletal Radiology

SN - 0364-2348

ER -