Incidence of clinically significant percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration

Halena M. Gazelka, Eric D. Freeman, W. Michael Hooten, Jason S. Eldrige, Bryan C. Hoelzer, William D. Mauck, Susan M. Moeschler, Matthew J. Pingree, Richard H. Rho, Tim J. Lamer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine the incidence of percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration, given current hardware and surgical technique. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of patients who underwent spinal cord stimulator implantation with percutaneous leads at our institution from 2008 through 2011. We determined the number of patients who required surgical revision for clinically significant lead migration. Results Clinically significant lead migration requiring surgical revision occurred in three of 143 patients (2.1%) with primary SCS system implants utilizing percutaneous-type leads. Conclusions The rate of lead migration observed in our practice was considerably lower than previously published estimates of clinically significant lead migration or revision for lead migration (13%-22%). However, our study did not determine the reason for the decreased rate, which may be influenced by current hardware and implant techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-125
Number of pages3
JournalNeuromodulation
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Spinal Cord
Incidence
Reoperation
Lead

Keywords

  • Neuromodulation
  • revision
  • stimulator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Gazelka, H. M., Freeman, E. D., Hooten, W. M., Eldrige, J. S., Hoelzer, B. C., Mauck, W. D., ... Lamer, T. J. (2015). Incidence of clinically significant percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration. Neuromodulation, 18(2), 123-125. https://doi.org/10.1111/ner.12184

Incidence of clinically significant percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration. / Gazelka, Halena M.; Freeman, Eric D.; Hooten, W. Michael; Eldrige, Jason S.; Hoelzer, Bryan C.; Mauck, William D.; Moeschler, Susan M.; Pingree, Matthew J.; Rho, Richard H.; Lamer, Tim J.

In: Neuromodulation, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 123-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gazelka, HM, Freeman, ED, Hooten, WM, Eldrige, JS, Hoelzer, BC, Mauck, WD, Moeschler, SM, Pingree, MJ, Rho, RH & Lamer, TJ 2015, 'Incidence of clinically significant percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration', Neuromodulation, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 123-125. https://doi.org/10.1111/ner.12184
Gazelka HM, Freeman ED, Hooten WM, Eldrige JS, Hoelzer BC, Mauck WD et al. Incidence of clinically significant percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration. Neuromodulation. 2015 Feb 1;18(2):123-125. https://doi.org/10.1111/ner.12184
Gazelka, Halena M. ; Freeman, Eric D. ; Hooten, W. Michael ; Eldrige, Jason S. ; Hoelzer, Bryan C. ; Mauck, William D. ; Moeschler, Susan M. ; Pingree, Matthew J. ; Rho, Richard H. ; Lamer, Tim J. / Incidence of clinically significant percutaneous spinal cord stimulator lead migration. In: Neuromodulation. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 123-125.
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