Incidence of alopecia areata in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1975 through 1989

K. H. Safavi, S. A. Muller, Vera Jean Suman, A. N. Moshell, L. J. Melton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

359 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the incidence and natural history of alopecia areata (AA) among unselected patients from a community. Design: We conducted a retrospective population-based descriptive study of AA among residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, for the period from 1975 through 1989. Material and Methods: After identifying 292 Olmsted County residents first diagnosed with AA during the 15-year study period, we reviewed their complete (inpatient and outpatient) medical records in the community and statistically analyzed the effects of gender and age-group. Results: The overall incidence of AA was 20.2 per 100,000 person-years and did not change with time. Rates were similar in the two genders and over all ages, and lifetime risk was estimated at 1.7%. Eighty-seven percent of patients were examined by a dermatologist who diagnosed AA, and 29% of cases were confirmed by biopsy. Most patients had mild or moderate disease, but alopecia totalis or universalis developed at some point during the clinical course in 21 patients. Conclusion: This study of the incidence and natural history of AA in a community shows that this disorder is fairly common and can be seen at all ages. Although spontaneous resolution is expected in most patients, a small but significant proportion of cases (probably approximately 7%) may evolve into severe and chronic hair loss, which may be psychosocially devastating for affected persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-633
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume70
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1995

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Alopecia Areata
Incidence
Alopecia
Medical Records
Inpatients
Cohort Studies
Outpatients
Age Groups
Biopsy
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Safavi, K. H., Muller, S. A., Suman, V. J., Moshell, A. N., & Melton, L. J. (1995). Incidence of alopecia areata in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1975 through 1989. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 70(7), 628-633.

Incidence of alopecia areata in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1975 through 1989. / Safavi, K. H.; Muller, S. A.; Suman, Vera Jean; Moshell, A. N.; Melton, L. J.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 70, No. 7, 1995, p. 628-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safavi, KH, Muller, SA, Suman, VJ, Moshell, AN & Melton, LJ 1995, 'Incidence of alopecia areata in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1975 through 1989', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 70, no. 7, pp. 628-633.
Safavi, K. H. ; Muller, S. A. ; Suman, Vera Jean ; Moshell, A. N. ; Melton, L. J. / Incidence of alopecia areata in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1975 through 1989. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1995 ; Vol. 70, No. 7. pp. 628-633.
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