Inability of bm14 mice to respond to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus is caused by defective antigen presentation, not repertoire selection

Matthew S. Block, Yanice V. Mendez-Fernandez, Virginia P. Van Keulen, Michael J. Hansen, Kathleen S. Allen, Anya L. Taboas, Moses Rodriguez, Larry R. Pease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Natural selection drives diversification of MHC class I proteins, but the mechanism by which selection for polymorphism occurs is not known. New variant class I alleles differ from parental alleles both in the nature of the CD8 T cell repertoire formed and the ability to present pathogen-derived peptides. In the current study, we examined whether T cell repertoire differences, Ag presentation differences, or both account for differential viral resistance between mice bearing variant and parental alleles. We demonstrate that nonresponsive mice have inadequate presentation of viral Ag, but have T cell repertoires capable of mounting Ag-specific responses. Although previous work suggests a correlation between the ability to present an Ag and the ability to generate a repertoire responsive to that Ag, we show that the two functions of MHC class I are independent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2756-2762
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume174
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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