Importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after microscopically incomplete resection of Stage III/IV head and neck cancer

Daniel Seidl, Stefan Janssen, Primoz Strojan, Samer G. Hakim, Barbara Wollenberg, Steven E. Schild, Dirk Rades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after R1 resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: One hundred and twenty-two patients receiving radiotherapy alone or with concurrent chemotherapy [cisplatin or cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU)] were retrospectively analyzed. Results: On multivariate analysis, chemotherapy was significantly associated with improved locoregional control (p=0.048). Three-year locoregional control rates were 61% for those treated without chemotherapy, 83% for those treated with cisplatin and 77% for those treated with cisplatin/5-FU. Radiation doses of 66 and 70 Gy were non-significantly superior to 60- 64 Gy (p=0.18). On multivariate analysis, chemotherapy showed a trend for improving survival (p=0.055). Three-year OS rates were 51% for those without chemotherapy, 65% for those treated with cisplatin and 57% for those treated with cisplatin/5-FU. Radiation doses of 66 Gy (3-year survival=61%) and 70 Gy (70%) were superior to 60-64 Gy (25%) (p=0.021). Conclusion: Concurrent chemotherapy and a radiation dose of 66 Gy resulted in better outcomes. Cisplatin and cisplatin/5-FU were similarly effective. Radiation doses >66 Gy appear not to be necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2487-2492
Number of pages6
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume36
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2016

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Head and Neck Neoplasms
Cisplatin
Radiation
Drug Therapy
Fluorouracil
Multivariate Analysis
Survival
Radiotherapy

Keywords

  • Completion of treatment
  • Head-and-neck cancer
  • Microscopically incomplete resection
  • Palliative radiation therapy
  • Radiation dose
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Seidl, D., Janssen, S., Strojan, P., Hakim, S. G., Wollenberg, B., Schild, S. E., & Rades, D. (2016). Importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after microscopically incomplete resection of Stage III/IV head and neck cancer. Anticancer Research, 36(5), 2487-2492.

Importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after microscopically incomplete resection of Stage III/IV head and neck cancer. / Seidl, Daniel; Janssen, Stefan; Strojan, Primoz; Hakim, Samer G.; Wollenberg, Barbara; Schild, Steven E.; Rades, Dirk.

In: Anticancer Research, Vol. 36, No. 5, 2016, p. 2487-2492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seidl, D, Janssen, S, Strojan, P, Hakim, SG, Wollenberg, B, Schild, SE & Rades, D 2016, 'Importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after microscopically incomplete resection of Stage III/IV head and neck cancer', Anticancer Research, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 2487-2492.
Seidl D, Janssen S, Strojan P, Hakim SG, Wollenberg B, Schild SE et al. Importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after microscopically incomplete resection of Stage III/IV head and neck cancer. Anticancer Research. 2016;36(5):2487-2492.
Seidl, Daniel ; Janssen, Stefan ; Strojan, Primoz ; Hakim, Samer G. ; Wollenberg, Barbara ; Schild, Steven E. ; Rades, Dirk. / Importance of chemotherapy and radiation dose after microscopically incomplete resection of Stage III/IV head and neck cancer. In: Anticancer Research. 2016 ; Vol. 36, No. 5. pp. 2487-2492.
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