Implications of obstructive sleep apnea for atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death

Apoor S. Gami, Virend Somers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder with important cardiovascular consequences, including arrhythmogenesis. The unique pathophysiology of OSA results in multiple intermediate mechanisms that may promote atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. These mechanisms may act acutely to trigger nocturnal dysrhythmias, or chronically by affecting the electrical and myocardial substrates. Burgeoning epidemiological data have identified an increased risk for atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death related to OSA. Currently, few data exist to support the efficacy of OSA therapy, namely continuous positive airway pressure, as an adjunct for arrhythmia prevention or management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)997-1003
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Sudden Cardiac Death
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Sleep
Respiration

Keywords

  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Sleep
  • Sleep apnea
  • Sudden cardiac death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Implications of obstructive sleep apnea for atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. / Gami, Apoor S.; Somers, Virend.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Vol. 19, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 997-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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