Implementation of evidence-based practices for children in four countries: A project of the World Psychiatric Association

Kimberly E. Hoagwood, Kelly Kelleher, Laura K. Murray, Peter S. Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study examined implementation issues in adopting cognitive-behavioral therapies in routine clinical settings in four countries reflecting diverse cultures, languages, settings, and traditions. Method: A Director's Systems Survey was administered prior to program implementation and one year later. Therapist ratings on attitudes about evidence-based practices and satisfaction were also gathered. Results: All sites reported successful adoption of the program, although significant variations existed in fiscal support, family involvement, prior experience with cognitive-behavioral therapies, and plans for sustainability. Therapists' ratings indicated overall satisfaction with the implementation of the project. Findings from the Director's Systems Survey pointed to five factors facilitating implementation: 1) early adoption and guidance by innovative leaders (i.e., the Directors); 2) attention to the "fit" between the intervention model and local practices; 3) attention to front-end implementation processes (e.g., cultural adaptation, translation, training, fiscal issues); 4) attention to back-end processes early in the project (e.g., sustainability); and 5) establishing strong relationships with multiple stakeholders within the program setting. Conclusions: The implementation issues here mirror those identified in other studies of evidence-based practices uptake. Some of the obstacles to implementation of evidence-based practices may be generic, whereas issues such as the impact of political/economic instability, availability of translated materials, constitute unique stressors that differentially affect implementation efforts within specific countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-66
Number of pages8
JournalRevista Brasileira de Psiquiatria
Volume28
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Evidence-Based Practice
Cognitive Therapy
Language
Economics
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Child
  • Cognitive therapy
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Feasibility studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Implementation of evidence-based practices for children in four countries : A project of the World Psychiatric Association. / Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Kelleher, Kelly; Murray, Laura K.; Jensen, Peter S.

In: Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, Vol. 28, No. 1, 03.2006, p. 59-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoagwood, Kimberly E. ; Kelleher, Kelly ; Murray, Laura K. ; Jensen, Peter S. / Implementation of evidence-based practices for children in four countries : A project of the World Psychiatric Association. In: Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria. 2006 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 59-66.
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