Impact of Vitamin D on the hospitalization rate of Crohn's disease patients seen at a tertiary care center

Krishna V.R. Venkata, Sumant S. Arora, Feng Long Xie, Talha Malik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM To study the association between vitamin D level and hospitalization rate in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. METHODS We designed a retrospective cohort study using adult patients (> 19 years) with CD followed for at least one year at our inflammatory bowel disease center. Vitamin D levels were divided into: low mean vitamin D level (< 30 ng/mL) vs appropriate mean vitamin D level (30-100 ng/mL). Generalized Poisson Regression Models (GPR) for Rate Data were used to estimate partially adjusted and fully adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of hospitalization among CD patients. We also examined IRRs for vitamin D level as a continuous variable. RESULTS Of the 880 CD patients, 196 patients with vitamin D level during the observation period were included. Partially adjusted model demonstrated that CD patients with a low mean vitamin D level were almost twice more likely to be admitted (IRR = 1.76, 95%CI: 1.38-2.24) compared to those with an appropriate vitamin D level. The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 1.44, 95%CI: 1.11-1.87). Partially adjusted model with vitamin D level as a continuous variable demonstrated, higher mean vitamin D level was associated with a 3% lower likelihood of admission with every unit (ng/mL) rise in mean vitamin D level (IRR = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96-0.98). The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.97-0.99). CONCLUSION Normal or adequate vitamin D stores may be protective in the clinical course of CD. However, this role needs to be further characterized and understood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2539-2544
Number of pages6
JournalWorld journal of gastroenterology
Volume23
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 14 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tertiary Care Centers
Vitamin D
Crohn Disease
Hospitalization
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Observation

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • Hospitalization rate
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin D deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Impact of Vitamin D on the hospitalization rate of Crohn's disease patients seen at a tertiary care center. / Venkata, Krishna V.R.; Arora, Sumant S.; Xie, Feng Long; Malik, Talha.

In: World journal of gastroenterology, Vol. 23, No. 14, 14.04.2017, p. 2539-2544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Venkata, Krishna V.R. ; Arora, Sumant S. ; Xie, Feng Long ; Malik, Talha. / Impact of Vitamin D on the hospitalization rate of Crohn's disease patients seen at a tertiary care center. In: World journal of gastroenterology. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 14. pp. 2539-2544.
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abstract = "AIM To study the association between vitamin D level and hospitalization rate in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. METHODS We designed a retrospective cohort study using adult patients (> 19 years) with CD followed for at least one year at our inflammatory bowel disease center. Vitamin D levels were divided into: low mean vitamin D level (< 30 ng/mL) vs appropriate mean vitamin D level (30-100 ng/mL). Generalized Poisson Regression Models (GPR) for Rate Data were used to estimate partially adjusted and fully adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of hospitalization among CD patients. We also examined IRRs for vitamin D level as a continuous variable. RESULTS Of the 880 CD patients, 196 patients with vitamin D level during the observation period were included. Partially adjusted model demonstrated that CD patients with a low mean vitamin D level were almost twice more likely to be admitted (IRR = 1.76, 95{\%}CI: 1.38-2.24) compared to those with an appropriate vitamin D level. The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 1.44, 95{\%}CI: 1.11-1.87). Partially adjusted model with vitamin D level as a continuous variable demonstrated, higher mean vitamin D level was associated with a 3{\%} lower likelihood of admission with every unit (ng/mL) rise in mean vitamin D level (IRR = 0.97, 95{\%}CI: 0.96-0.98). The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 0.98, 95{\%}CI: 0.97-0.99). CONCLUSION Normal or adequate vitamin D stores may be protective in the clinical course of CD. However, this role needs to be further characterized and understood.",
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N2 - AIM To study the association between vitamin D level and hospitalization rate in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. METHODS We designed a retrospective cohort study using adult patients (> 19 years) with CD followed for at least one year at our inflammatory bowel disease center. Vitamin D levels were divided into: low mean vitamin D level (< 30 ng/mL) vs appropriate mean vitamin D level (30-100 ng/mL). Generalized Poisson Regression Models (GPR) for Rate Data were used to estimate partially adjusted and fully adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of hospitalization among CD patients. We also examined IRRs for vitamin D level as a continuous variable. RESULTS Of the 880 CD patients, 196 patients with vitamin D level during the observation period were included. Partially adjusted model demonstrated that CD patients with a low mean vitamin D level were almost twice more likely to be admitted (IRR = 1.76, 95%CI: 1.38-2.24) compared to those with an appropriate vitamin D level. The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 1.44, 95%CI: 1.11-1.87). Partially adjusted model with vitamin D level as a continuous variable demonstrated, higher mean vitamin D level was associated with a 3% lower likelihood of admission with every unit (ng/mL) rise in mean vitamin D level (IRR = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96-0.98). The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.97-0.99). CONCLUSION Normal or adequate vitamin D stores may be protective in the clinical course of CD. However, this role needs to be further characterized and understood.

AB - AIM To study the association between vitamin D level and hospitalization rate in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. METHODS We designed a retrospective cohort study using adult patients (> 19 years) with CD followed for at least one year at our inflammatory bowel disease center. Vitamin D levels were divided into: low mean vitamin D level (< 30 ng/mL) vs appropriate mean vitamin D level (30-100 ng/mL). Generalized Poisson Regression Models (GPR) for Rate Data were used to estimate partially adjusted and fully adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of hospitalization among CD patients. We also examined IRRs for vitamin D level as a continuous variable. RESULTS Of the 880 CD patients, 196 patients with vitamin D level during the observation period were included. Partially adjusted model demonstrated that CD patients with a low mean vitamin D level were almost twice more likely to be admitted (IRR = 1.76, 95%CI: 1.38-2.24) compared to those with an appropriate vitamin D level. The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 1.44, 95%CI: 1.11-1.87). Partially adjusted model with vitamin D level as a continuous variable demonstrated, higher mean vitamin D level was associated with a 3% lower likelihood of admission with every unit (ng/mL) rise in mean vitamin D level (IRR = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96-0.98). The fully adjusted model confirmed this association (IRR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.97-0.99). CONCLUSION Normal or adequate vitamin D stores may be protective in the clinical course of CD. However, this role needs to be further characterized and understood.

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