Impact of preoperative diagnosis on patient satisfaction following lumbar spine surgery

Charles H. Crawford, Leah Y. Carreon, Mohamad Bydon, Anthony L. Asher, Steven D. Glassman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Patient satisfaction is a commonly used metric in the current health care environment. While factors that affect patient satisfaction following spine surgery are complex, the authors of this study hypothesized that specific diagnostic groups of patients are more likely to be satisfied after spine surgery and that this is reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. The purpose of this study was to determine if the preoperative diagnosis - disc herniation, stenosis, spondylolisthesis, adjacent segment degeneration, or mechanical disc collapse - would impact patient satisfaction following surgery. METHODS: Patients enrolled in the Quality Outcomes Database, formerly known as the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N2QOD), completed patient-reported outcome measures, including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for back pain (NRS-BP) and leg pain (NRS-LP) preoperatively and 1-year postoperatively. Patients were stratified by diagnosis and by their response to the satisfaction question: 1) surgery met my expectations; 2) I did not improve as much as I hoped, but I would undergo the same operation for the same results; 3) surgery helped, but I would not undergo the same operation for the same results; or 4) I am the same or worse as compared with before surgery. RESULTS: A greater proportion of patients with primary disc herniation or spondylolisthesis reported that surgery met expectations (66% and 67%, respectively), followed by recurrent disc herniation and stenosis (59% and 60%, respectively). A smaller proportion of patients who underwent surgery for adjacent segment degeneration or mechanical disc collapse had their expectations met (48% and 41%, respectively). The percentage of patients that would undergo the same surgery again, by diagnostic group, was as follows: disc herniation 88%, recurrent disc herniation 79%, spondylolisthesis 86%, stenosis 82%, adjacent segment disease 75%, and mechanical collapse 73%. Regardless of diagnosis, mean improvement and ultimate 1-year postoperative ODI, NRS-BP, and NRS-LP reflected patient satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative diagnosis was predictive of patient satisfaction following spine surgery. The mean change in and 1-year ODI, NRS-BP, and NRS-LP reflected patient satisfaction regardless of preoperative diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-715
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Lumbar surgery
  • Patient reported outcomes
  • Patient satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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