Impact of point-of-care decision support tool on laboratory screening for comorbidities in children with obesity

Tara K. Kaufman, Natalie Gentile, Seema M Kumar, Marian Halle, Brian A. Lynch, Valeria Cristiani, Karen Fischer, Rajeev Chaudhry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Childhood obesity is associated with dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. Expert guidelines recommend screening for these conditions in children with obesity. Aims and objectives: The objective of the study was to compare rates of laboratory screening for dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes in children with obesity prior to and following implementation of a point-of-care decision support tool. Methods: We performed a retrospective record review of children with body mass index (BMI) ≥95th percentile for age and gender (age 7–18 years) undergoing well-child/sports examination visits. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to adjust for patient and provider confounders. Results: There was no increase in the rates of screening following implementation of the point-of-care decision support tool. Tests were more likely to be recommended in children with severe obesity and in females. Conclusions: The implementation of a point-of-care decision support tool was not associated with improvement in screening rates for dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes for children with obesity. Further strategies are needed to improve rates of screening for obesity-related comorbid conditions in children with obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number67
JournalChildren
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Comorbidity
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Dyslipidemia
  • Liver diseases
  • Pediatric obesity
  • Point-of-care systems
  • Type 2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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