Impact of personalized genetic breast cancer risk estimation with polygenic risk scores on preventive endocrine therapy intention and uptake

Julian O. Kim, Daniel J. Schaid, Celine M. Vachon, Andrew Cooke, Fergus J. Couch, Christina A. Kim, Jason P. Sinnwell, Linda Hasadsri, Daniela L. Stan, Benjamin Goldenberg, Lonzetta Neal, Debjani Grenier, Amy C. Degnim, Lori A. Thicke, Sandhya Pruthi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Endocrine therapy is underutilized to reduce breast cancer incidence among women at increased risk. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) assessing 77 breast cancer genetic susceptibility loci personalizes risk estimates. We examined effect of personalized PRS breast cancer risk prediction on intention to take and endocrine therapy uptake among women at increased risk. Eligible participants had a 10-year breast cancer risk ≥5% by Tyrer. Cuzick model [International Breast Cancer Intervention Study (IBIS)] or ≥3.0%5-year GailModel risk with no breast cancer history or hereditary breast cancer syndrome. Breast cancer risk was estimated, endocrine therapy options were discussed, and endocrine therapy intent was assessed at baseline. After genotyping, PRS-updated breast cancer risk estimates, endocrine therapy options, and intent to take endocrine therapy were reassessed; endocrine therapy uptake was assessed during follow-up. From March 2016 to October 2017, 151 patients were enrolled [median (range) age, 56.1 (36.0. 76.4 years)]. Median 10-year and lifetime IBIS risks were 7.9% and 25.3%. Inclusion of PRS increased lifetime IBIS breast cancer risk estimates for 81 patients (53.6%) and reduced risk for 70 (46.4%). Of participants with increased breast cancer risk by PRS, 39 (41.9%) had greater intent to take endocrine therapy; of those with decreased breast cancer risk by PRS, 28 (46.7%) had less intent to take endocrine therapy (P < 0.001). On multivariable regression, increased breast cancer risk by PRSwas associated with greater intent to take endocrine therapy (P < 0.001). Endocrine therapy uptake was greater among participants with increased breast cancer risk by PRS (53.4%) than with decreased risk (20.9%; P < 0.001). PRS testing influenced intent to take and endocrine therapy uptake. Assessing PRS effect on endocrine therapy adherence is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-184
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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