Impact of human herpes virus 6 in liver transplantation

Raymund R Razonable, Irmeli Lautenschlager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) infects > 95% of humans. Primary infection which occurs mostly during the first 2 years of life in the form of roseola infantum, non-specific febrile illness, or an asymptomatic illness, results in latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation. Since the majority of human beings harbor the latent virus, HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are most probably caused by endogenous reactivation or superinfection. In a minority of cases, primary HHV-6 infection may occur when an HHV-6-seronegative individual receives a liver allograft from an HHV-6-seropositive donor. The vast majority of HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are asymptomatic. Only in a minority of cases, when HHV-6 causes a febrile illness associated with rash and myelosuppression, hepatitis, gastroenteritis, pneumonitis, and encephalitis after liver transplantation. In addition, HHV-6 has been implicated in a variety of indirect effects, such as allograft rejection and increased predisposition to and severity of other infections, including cytomegalovirus, hepatitis C virus, and opportunistic fungi. Because of the uncommon nature of the clinical illnesses directly attributed to HHV-6, there is currently no recommended HHV-6-specific approach prevention after liver transplantation. Asymptomatic HHV-6 infection does not require antiviral treatment, while treatment of established HHV-6 disease is treated with intravenous ganciclovir, foscarnet, or cidofovir and this should be complemented by a reduction in immunosuppression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-353
Number of pages9
JournalWorld Journal of Hepatology
Volume2
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Liver Transplantation
Viruses
Virus Diseases
Allografts
Exanthema Subitum
Fever
Foscarnet
Superinfection
Ganciclovir
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Gastroenteritis
Encephalitis
Exanthema
Hepacivirus
Immunosuppression
Hepatitis
Antiviral Agents
Pneumonia
Fungi

Keywords

  • Antivirals
  • Human herpes virus 6
  • Liver transplantation
  • Opportunistic infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Impact of human herpes virus 6 in liver transplantation. / Razonable, Raymund R; Lautenschlager, Irmeli.

In: World Journal of Hepatology, Vol. 2, No. 9, 2010, p. 345-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Razonable, Raymund R ; Lautenschlager, Irmeli. / Impact of human herpes virus 6 in liver transplantation. In: World Journal of Hepatology. 2010 ; Vol. 2, No. 9. pp. 345-353.
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