Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations

Elena Sánchez, Astrid Rasmussen, Laura Riba, Eduardo Acevedo-Vasquez, Jennifer A. Kelly, Carl D. Langefeld, Adrianne H. Williams, Julie T. Ziegler, Mary E. Comeau, Miranda C. Marion, Ignacio García-De La Torre, Marco A. Maradiaga-Ceceña, Mario H. Cardiel, Jorge A. Esquivel-Valerio, Jacqueline Rodriguez-Amado, José Francisco Moctezuma, Pedro Miranda, Carlos E. Perandones, Cecilia Castel, Hugo A. LabordePaula Alba, Jorge L. Musuruana, I. Annelise Goecke, Juan Manuel Anaya, Kenneth M. Kaufman, Adam Adler, Stuart B. Glenn, Elizabeth E. Brown, Graciela S. Alarcón, Robert P. Kimberly, Jeffrey C. Edberg, Luis M. Vilá, Lindsey A. Criswell, Gary S. Gilkeson, Timothy B. Niewold, Javier Martín, Timothy J. Vyse, Susan A. Boackle, Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, R. Hal Scofield, Michelle Petri, Joan T. Merrill, John D. Reveille, Betty P. Tsao, Lorena Orozco, Vicente Baca, Kathy L. Moser, Patrick M. Gaffney, Judith A. James, John B. Harley, Teresa Tusié-Luna, Bernardo A. Pons-Estel, Chaim O. Jacob, Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective American Indian-Europeans, Asians, and African Americans have an excess morbidity from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a higher prevalence of lupus nephritis than do Caucasians. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features in a large cohort of American Indian-European SLE patients. Methods A total of 2,116 SLE patients of American Indian-European origin and 4,001 SLE patients of European descent for whom we had clinical data were included in the study. Genotyping of 253 continental ancestry-informative markers was performed on the Illumina platform. Structure and Admixture software were used to determine genetic ancestry proportions of each individual. Logistic regression was used to test the association between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results The average American Indian genetic ancestry of 2,116 SLE patients was 40.7%. American Indian genetic ancestry conferred increased risks of renal involvement (P < 0.0001, OR 3.50 [95% CI 2.63- 4.63]) and early age at onset (P < 0.0001). American Indian ancestry protected against photosensitivity (P < 0.0001, OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.44-0.76]), oral ulcers (P < 0.0001, OR 0.55 [95% CI 0.42-0.72]), and serositis (P < 0.0001, OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.41-0.75]) after adjustment for age, sex, and age at onset. However, age and sex had stronger effects than genetic ancestry on malar rash, discoid rash, arthritis, and neurologic involvement. Conclusion In general, American Indian genetic ancestry correlates with lower sociodemographic status and increases the risk of developing renal involvement and SLE at an earlier age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3687-3694
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume64
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Exanthema
Age of Onset
Serositis
Oral Ulcer
Kidney
Lupus Nephritis
Asian Americans
African Americans
Nervous System
Arthritis
Software
Logistic Models
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Sánchez, E., Rasmussen, A., Riba, L., Acevedo-Vasquez, E., Kelly, J. A., Langefeld, C. D., ... Alarcón-Riquelme, M. E. (2012). Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 64(11), 3687-3694. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.34650

Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations. / Sánchez, Elena; Rasmussen, Astrid; Riba, Laura; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Williams, Adrianne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Moctezuma, José Francisco; Miranda, Pedro; Perandones, Carlos E.; Castel, Cecilia; Laborde, Hugo A.; Alba, Paula; Musuruana, Jorge L.; Goecke, I. Annelise; Anaya, Juan Manuel; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Vilá, Luis M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Martín, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J.; Boackle, Susan A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Scofield, R. Hal; Petri, Michelle; Merrill, Joan T.; Reveille, John D.; Tsao, Betty P.; Orozco, Lorena; Baca, Vicente; Moser, Kathy L.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 64, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 3687-3694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sánchez, E, Rasmussen, A, Riba, L, Acevedo-Vasquez, E, Kelly, JA, Langefeld, CD, Williams, AH, Ziegler, JT, Comeau, ME, Marion, MC, García-De La Torre, I, Maradiaga-Ceceña, MA, Cardiel, MH, Esquivel-Valerio, JA, Rodriguez-Amado, J, Moctezuma, JF, Miranda, P, Perandones, CE, Castel, C, Laborde, HA, Alba, P, Musuruana, JL, Goecke, IA, Anaya, JM, Kaufman, KM, Adler, A, Glenn, SB, Brown, EE, Alarcón, GS, Kimberly, RP, Edberg, JC, Vilá, LM, Criswell, LA, Gilkeson, GS, Niewold, TB, Martín, J, Vyse, TJ, Boackle, SA, Ramsey-Goldman, R, Scofield, RH, Petri, M, Merrill, JT, Reveille, JD, Tsao, BP, Orozco, L, Baca, V, Moser, KL, Gaffney, PM, James, JA, Harley, JB, Tusié-Luna, T, Pons-Estel, BA, Jacob, CO & Alarcón-Riquelme, ME 2012, 'Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations', Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 64, no. 11, pp. 3687-3694. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.34650
Sánchez, Elena ; Rasmussen, Astrid ; Riba, Laura ; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo ; Kelly, Jennifer A. ; Langefeld, Carl D. ; Williams, Adrianne H. ; Ziegler, Julie T. ; Comeau, Mary E. ; Marion, Miranda C. ; García-De La Torre, Ignacio ; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A. ; Cardiel, Mario H. ; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A. ; Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline ; Moctezuma, José Francisco ; Miranda, Pedro ; Perandones, Carlos E. ; Castel, Cecilia ; Laborde, Hugo A. ; Alba, Paula ; Musuruana, Jorge L. ; Goecke, I. Annelise ; Anaya, Juan Manuel ; Kaufman, Kenneth M. ; Adler, Adam ; Glenn, Stuart B. ; Brown, Elizabeth E. ; Alarcón, Graciela S. ; Kimberly, Robert P. ; Edberg, Jeffrey C. ; Vilá, Luis M. ; Criswell, Lindsey A. ; Gilkeson, Gary S. ; Niewold, Timothy B. ; Martín, Javier ; Vyse, Timothy J. ; Boackle, Susan A. ; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind ; Scofield, R. Hal ; Petri, Michelle ; Merrill, Joan T. ; Reveille, John D. ; Tsao, Betty P. ; Orozco, Lorena ; Baca, Vicente ; Moser, Kathy L. ; Gaffney, Patrick M. ; James, Judith A. ; Harley, John B. ; Tusié-Luna, Teresa ; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A. ; Jacob, Chaim O. ; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E. / Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2012 ; Vol. 64, No. 11. pp. 3687-3694.
@article{b4923d9ffbe14f0e97d20099a346f76c,
title = "Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations",
abstract = "Objective American Indian-Europeans, Asians, and African Americans have an excess morbidity from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a higher prevalence of lupus nephritis than do Caucasians. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features in a large cohort of American Indian-European SLE patients. Methods A total of 2,116 SLE patients of American Indian-European origin and 4,001 SLE patients of European descent for whom we had clinical data were included in the study. Genotyping of 253 continental ancestry-informative markers was performed on the Illumina platform. Structure and Admixture software were used to determine genetic ancestry proportions of each individual. Logistic regression was used to test the association between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%} CIs). Results The average American Indian genetic ancestry of 2,116 SLE patients was 40.7{\%}. American Indian genetic ancestry conferred increased risks of renal involvement (P < 0.0001, OR 3.50 [95{\%} CI 2.63- 4.63]) and early age at onset (P < 0.0001). American Indian ancestry protected against photosensitivity (P < 0.0001, OR 0.58 [95{\%} CI 0.44-0.76]), oral ulcers (P < 0.0001, OR 0.55 [95{\%} CI 0.42-0.72]), and serositis (P < 0.0001, OR 0.56 [95{\%} CI 0.41-0.75]) after adjustment for age, sex, and age at onset. However, age and sex had stronger effects than genetic ancestry on malar rash, discoid rash, arthritis, and neurologic involvement. Conclusion In general, American Indian genetic ancestry correlates with lower sociodemographic status and increases the risk of developing renal involvement and SLE at an earlier age.",
author = "Elena S{\'a}nchez and Astrid Rasmussen and Laura Riba and Eduardo Acevedo-Vasquez and Kelly, {Jennifer A.} and Langefeld, {Carl D.} and Williams, {Adrianne H.} and Ziegler, {Julie T.} and Comeau, {Mary E.} and Marion, {Miranda C.} and {Garc{\'i}a-De La Torre}, Ignacio and Maradiaga-Cece{\~n}a, {Marco A.} and Cardiel, {Mario H.} and Esquivel-Valerio, {Jorge A.} and Jacqueline Rodriguez-Amado and Moctezuma, {Jos{\'e} Francisco} and Pedro Miranda and Perandones, {Carlos E.} and Cecilia Castel and Laborde, {Hugo A.} and Paula Alba and Musuruana, {Jorge L.} and Goecke, {I. Annelise} and Anaya, {Juan Manuel} and Kaufman, {Kenneth M.} and Adam Adler and Glenn, {Stuart B.} and Brown, {Elizabeth E.} and Alarc{\'o}n, {Graciela S.} and Kimberly, {Robert P.} and Edberg, {Jeffrey C.} and Vil{\'a}, {Luis M.} and Criswell, {Lindsey A.} and Gilkeson, {Gary S.} and Niewold, {Timothy B.} and Javier Mart{\'i}n and Vyse, {Timothy J.} and Boackle, {Susan A.} and Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman and Scofield, {R. Hal} and Michelle Petri and Merrill, {Joan T.} and Reveille, {John D.} and Tsao, {Betty P.} and Lorena Orozco and Vicente Baca and Moser, {Kathy L.} and Gaffney, {Patrick M.} and James, {Judith A.} and Harley, {John B.} and Teresa Tusi{\'e}-Luna and Pons-Estel, {Bernardo A.} and Jacob, {Chaim O.} and Alarc{\'o}n-Riquelme, {Marta E.}",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1002/art.34650",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "3687--3694",
journal = "Arthritis and Rheumatology",
issn = "2326-5191",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations

AU - Sánchez, Elena

AU - Rasmussen, Astrid

AU - Riba, Laura

AU - Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo

AU - Kelly, Jennifer A.

AU - Langefeld, Carl D.

AU - Williams, Adrianne H.

AU - Ziegler, Julie T.

AU - Comeau, Mary E.

AU - Marion, Miranda C.

AU - García-De La Torre, Ignacio

AU - Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A.

AU - Cardiel, Mario H.

AU - Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.

AU - Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline

AU - Moctezuma, José Francisco

AU - Miranda, Pedro

AU - Perandones, Carlos E.

AU - Castel, Cecilia

AU - Laborde, Hugo A.

AU - Alba, Paula

AU - Musuruana, Jorge L.

AU - Goecke, I. Annelise

AU - Anaya, Juan Manuel

AU - Kaufman, Kenneth M.

AU - Adler, Adam

AU - Glenn, Stuart B.

AU - Brown, Elizabeth E.

AU - Alarcón, Graciela S.

AU - Kimberly, Robert P.

AU - Edberg, Jeffrey C.

AU - Vilá, Luis M.

AU - Criswell, Lindsey A.

AU - Gilkeson, Gary S.

AU - Niewold, Timothy B.

AU - Martín, Javier

AU - Vyse, Timothy J.

AU - Boackle, Susan A.

AU - Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

AU - Scofield, R. Hal

AU - Petri, Michelle

AU - Merrill, Joan T.

AU - Reveille, John D.

AU - Tsao, Betty P.

AU - Orozco, Lorena

AU - Baca, Vicente

AU - Moser, Kathy L.

AU - Gaffney, Patrick M.

AU - James, Judith A.

AU - Harley, John B.

AU - Tusié-Luna, Teresa

AU - Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.

AU - Jacob, Chaim O.

AU - Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

PY - 2012/11

Y1 - 2012/11

N2 - Objective American Indian-Europeans, Asians, and African Americans have an excess morbidity from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a higher prevalence of lupus nephritis than do Caucasians. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features in a large cohort of American Indian-European SLE patients. Methods A total of 2,116 SLE patients of American Indian-European origin and 4,001 SLE patients of European descent for whom we had clinical data were included in the study. Genotyping of 253 continental ancestry-informative markers was performed on the Illumina platform. Structure and Admixture software were used to determine genetic ancestry proportions of each individual. Logistic regression was used to test the association between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results The average American Indian genetic ancestry of 2,116 SLE patients was 40.7%. American Indian genetic ancestry conferred increased risks of renal involvement (P < 0.0001, OR 3.50 [95% CI 2.63- 4.63]) and early age at onset (P < 0.0001). American Indian ancestry protected against photosensitivity (P < 0.0001, OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.44-0.76]), oral ulcers (P < 0.0001, OR 0.55 [95% CI 0.42-0.72]), and serositis (P < 0.0001, OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.41-0.75]) after adjustment for age, sex, and age at onset. However, age and sex had stronger effects than genetic ancestry on malar rash, discoid rash, arthritis, and neurologic involvement. Conclusion In general, American Indian genetic ancestry correlates with lower sociodemographic status and increases the risk of developing renal involvement and SLE at an earlier age.

AB - Objective American Indian-Europeans, Asians, and African Americans have an excess morbidity from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a higher prevalence of lupus nephritis than do Caucasians. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features in a large cohort of American Indian-European SLE patients. Methods A total of 2,116 SLE patients of American Indian-European origin and 4,001 SLE patients of European descent for whom we had clinical data were included in the study. Genotyping of 253 continental ancestry-informative markers was performed on the Illumina platform. Structure and Admixture software were used to determine genetic ancestry proportions of each individual. Logistic regression was used to test the association between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results The average American Indian genetic ancestry of 2,116 SLE patients was 40.7%. American Indian genetic ancestry conferred increased risks of renal involvement (P < 0.0001, OR 3.50 [95% CI 2.63- 4.63]) and early age at onset (P < 0.0001). American Indian ancestry protected against photosensitivity (P < 0.0001, OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.44-0.76]), oral ulcers (P < 0.0001, OR 0.55 [95% CI 0.42-0.72]), and serositis (P < 0.0001, OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.41-0.75]) after adjustment for age, sex, and age at onset. However, age and sex had stronger effects than genetic ancestry on malar rash, discoid rash, arthritis, and neurologic involvement. Conclusion In general, American Indian genetic ancestry correlates with lower sociodemographic status and increases the risk of developing renal involvement and SLE at an earlier age.

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