Impact of functional gastrointestinal disorders on health-related quality of life

A population-based case-control study

S. L S Halder, G. R. Locke, N. J. Talley, S. L. Fett, A. R. Zinsmeister, L. J. Melton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

146 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The health-related quality of life is impaired in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders seen in referral centres. Aim: To determine whether the health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with functional disorders in the community and whether any differences can be explained by psychological co-morbidity. Methods: In a population-based, nested, case-control study, subjects reporting symptoms of either dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls were interviewed and completed a battery of psychological measures plus a validated, generic, health-related quality of life measure (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey, SF-36). The association between irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia and the physical and mental composite scores of SF-36 were assessed with and without adjustment for psychological state. Results: One hundred and twelve cases (30 dyspepsia, 39 irritable bowel syndrome, 32 dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome and 11 gastrointestinal symptoms but not dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome) and 110 controls were enrolled. In the unadjusted linear regression models, irritable bowel syndrome (but not dyspepsia) was negatively associated with the physical composite score (P < 0.05); in an adjusted model, the association between the physical health-related quality of life and irritable bowel syndrome was explained by the Symptom Checklist-90 somatization score alone. In unadjusted models, irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia were each negatively associated with the mental composite score (P < 0.05). The association between the mental health-related quality of life and dyspepsia remained after adjusting for psychological covariates, but the association between this and irritable bowel syndrome was not significant after adjustment. Conclusions: In the community, health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia; however, much of this association can be explained by psychological factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-242
Number of pages10
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2004

Fingerprint

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Dyspepsia
Case-Control Studies
Quality of Life
Population
Psychology
Linear Models
Social Adjustment
Health Surveys
Checklist
Referral and Consultation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Impact of functional gastrointestinal disorders on health-related quality of life : A population-based case-control study. / Halder, S. L S; Locke, G. R.; Talley, N. J.; Fett, S. L.; Zinsmeister, A. R.; Melton, L. J.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 19, No. 2, 15.01.2004, p. 233-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Halder, S. L S ; Locke, G. R. ; Talley, N. J. ; Fett, S. L. ; Zinsmeister, A. R. ; Melton, L. J. / Impact of functional gastrointestinal disorders on health-related quality of life : A population-based case-control study. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 233-242.
@article{b769b0ec575c4263920bb712dfe6b6a2,
title = "Impact of functional gastrointestinal disorders on health-related quality of life: A population-based case-control study",
abstract = "Background: The health-related quality of life is impaired in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders seen in referral centres. Aim: To determine whether the health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with functional disorders in the community and whether any differences can be explained by psychological co-morbidity. Methods: In a population-based, nested, case-control study, subjects reporting symptoms of either dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls were interviewed and completed a battery of psychological measures plus a validated, generic, health-related quality of life measure (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey, SF-36). The association between irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia and the physical and mental composite scores of SF-36 were assessed with and without adjustment for psychological state. Results: One hundred and twelve cases (30 dyspepsia, 39 irritable bowel syndrome, 32 dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome and 11 gastrointestinal symptoms but not dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome) and 110 controls were enrolled. In the unadjusted linear regression models, irritable bowel syndrome (but not dyspepsia) was negatively associated with the physical composite score (P < 0.05); in an adjusted model, the association between the physical health-related quality of life and irritable bowel syndrome was explained by the Symptom Checklist-90 somatization score alone. In unadjusted models, irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia were each negatively associated with the mental composite score (P < 0.05). The association between the mental health-related quality of life and dyspepsia remained after adjusting for psychological covariates, but the association between this and irritable bowel syndrome was not significant after adjustment. Conclusions: In the community, health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia; however, much of this association can be explained by psychological factors.",
author = "Halder, {S. L S} and Locke, {G. R.} and Talley, {N. J.} and Fett, {S. L.} and Zinsmeister, {A. R.} and Melton, {L. J.}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1111/j.0269-2813.2004.01807.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "233--242",
journal = "Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics",
issn = "0269-2813",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of functional gastrointestinal disorders on health-related quality of life

T2 - A population-based case-control study

AU - Halder, S. L S

AU - Locke, G. R.

AU - Talley, N. J.

AU - Fett, S. L.

AU - Zinsmeister, A. R.

AU - Melton, L. J.

PY - 2004/1/15

Y1 - 2004/1/15

N2 - Background: The health-related quality of life is impaired in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders seen in referral centres. Aim: To determine whether the health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with functional disorders in the community and whether any differences can be explained by psychological co-morbidity. Methods: In a population-based, nested, case-control study, subjects reporting symptoms of either dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls were interviewed and completed a battery of psychological measures plus a validated, generic, health-related quality of life measure (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey, SF-36). The association between irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia and the physical and mental composite scores of SF-36 were assessed with and without adjustment for psychological state. Results: One hundred and twelve cases (30 dyspepsia, 39 irritable bowel syndrome, 32 dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome and 11 gastrointestinal symptoms but not dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome) and 110 controls were enrolled. In the unadjusted linear regression models, irritable bowel syndrome (but not dyspepsia) was negatively associated with the physical composite score (P < 0.05); in an adjusted model, the association between the physical health-related quality of life and irritable bowel syndrome was explained by the Symptom Checklist-90 somatization score alone. In unadjusted models, irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia were each negatively associated with the mental composite score (P < 0.05). The association between the mental health-related quality of life and dyspepsia remained after adjusting for psychological covariates, but the association between this and irritable bowel syndrome was not significant after adjustment. Conclusions: In the community, health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia; however, much of this association can be explained by psychological factors.

AB - Background: The health-related quality of life is impaired in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders seen in referral centres. Aim: To determine whether the health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with functional disorders in the community and whether any differences can be explained by psychological co-morbidity. Methods: In a population-based, nested, case-control study, subjects reporting symptoms of either dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls were interviewed and completed a battery of psychological measures plus a validated, generic, health-related quality of life measure (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey, SF-36). The association between irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia and the physical and mental composite scores of SF-36 were assessed with and without adjustment for psychological state. Results: One hundred and twelve cases (30 dyspepsia, 39 irritable bowel syndrome, 32 dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome and 11 gastrointestinal symptoms but not dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome) and 110 controls were enrolled. In the unadjusted linear regression models, irritable bowel syndrome (but not dyspepsia) was negatively associated with the physical composite score (P < 0.05); in an adjusted model, the association between the physical health-related quality of life and irritable bowel syndrome was explained by the Symptom Checklist-90 somatization score alone. In unadjusted models, irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia were each negatively associated with the mental composite score (P < 0.05). The association between the mental health-related quality of life and dyspepsia remained after adjusting for psychological covariates, but the association between this and irritable bowel syndrome was not significant after adjustment. Conclusions: In the community, health-related quality of life is impaired in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia; however, much of this association can be explained by psychological factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0842265199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0842265199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.0269-2813.2004.01807.x

DO - 10.1111/j.0269-2813.2004.01807.x

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 233

EP - 242

JO - Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

JF - Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

SN - 0269-2813

IS - 2

ER -