Impact of Contraception on Female Sexual Function

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sexual dysfunction is common among US women of reproductive age, many of whom use contraception. Various contraceptive methods have been associated with changes in sexual function. Methods: In this narrative review, we selected key articles based on our collective clinical experience. We summarized findings and best practice recommendations for addressing a woman's contraception and its potential relationship to sexual function. Results: Although some hormonal contraception is associated with sexual dysfunction, studies show mixed results based on route of administration and progestin component. Interestingly, nonuse of contraception also appears to be associated with sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction. Low-dose vaginal estrogen, lubricants, and moisturizers may be used for treating vaginal dryness in the setting of hypoestrogenic states in reproductive-age women. Conclusion: A review of current contraception is appropriate for women presenting with sexual health concerns. Sexual dysfunction chronologically associated with a contraceptive may be addressed by trial of an alternative method. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment is recommended, including sex therapy, pelvic floor physical therapy, and consultation with a women's health specialist as needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-213
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Contraception
Lubricants
Pelvic Floor
Reproductive Health
Women's Health
Progestins
Contraceptive Agents
Practice Guidelines
Estrogens
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • contraception
  • dyspareunia
  • female sexual dysfunction
  • genitourinary syndrome of menopause
  • oral contraceptive pills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Impact of Contraception on Female Sexual Function. / Casey, Petra Marcela; Mac Laughlin, Kathy; Faubion, Stephanie S.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 207-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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