Impact of a family history of prostate cancer on clinicopathologic outcomes and survival following radical prostatectomy

Mary E. Westerman, Boris Gershman, Robert Jeffrey Karnes, R. Houston Thompson, Laureano Rangel, Stephen A. Boorjian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: While a family history (FH) of prostate cancer represents an established risk factor for prostate cancer diagnosis, conflicting data exist regarding the oncologic importance of FH. Herein, we evaluated the association of FH with clinicopathologic outcomes among men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods: We identified 16,472 men who underwent RP between 1987 and 2010 at Mayo Clinic. Patients were considered to have a positive FH if at least one first-degree relative had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The associations of FH with clinicopathologic features and survival were evaluated using logistic and Cox regression analyses. Results: Overall, 5323 (32.3 %) men reported a FH of prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 9.9 years (IQR 5.9, 15.5). Patients with a FH were significantly more likely to have low-risk disease (47.7 vs. 43.0 %; p <0.0001) and were significantly more likely to have organ-confined disease at RP (79.2 vs. 74.4 %; p <0.0001). Men with FH had a significantly higher 10-year cancer-specific (99 vs. 97 %; p <0.001) and overall survival (92 vs. 85 %; p <0.001) than men without FH. Moreover, on multivariable analysis, FH of prostate cancer remained independently associated with reduced cancer-specific (HR 0.68; p = 0.003) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.69; p <0.0001). Conclusion: In this surgical population, FH of prostate cancer was associated with lower-risk disease at diagnosis, more favorable pathology at RP, and significantly better cancer-specific and overall survival. These results may be utilized for patient counseling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalWorld Journal of Urology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 9 2015

Fingerprint

Prostatectomy
Prostatic Neoplasms
Survival
Neoplasms
Counseling
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Pathology
Mortality

Keywords

  • Family history
  • Localized prostate cancer
  • Oncologic outcomes
  • Radical prostatectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Impact of a family history of prostate cancer on clinicopathologic outcomes and survival following radical prostatectomy. / Westerman, Mary E.; Gershman, Boris; Karnes, Robert Jeffrey; Thompson, R. Houston; Rangel, Laureano; Boorjian, Stephen A.

In: World Journal of Urology, 09.12.2015, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Westerman, Mary E. ; Gershman, Boris ; Karnes, Robert Jeffrey ; Thompson, R. Houston ; Rangel, Laureano ; Boorjian, Stephen A. / Impact of a family history of prostate cancer on clinicopathologic outcomes and survival following radical prostatectomy. In: World Journal of Urology. 2015 ; pp. 1-8.
@article{30f762b78c2648ecbc7d0fc4f208ab2c,
title = "Impact of a family history of prostate cancer on clinicopathologic outcomes and survival following radical prostatectomy",
abstract = "Purpose: While a family history (FH) of prostate cancer represents an established risk factor for prostate cancer diagnosis, conflicting data exist regarding the oncologic importance of FH. Herein, we evaluated the association of FH with clinicopathologic outcomes among men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods: We identified 16,472 men who underwent RP between 1987 and 2010 at Mayo Clinic. Patients were considered to have a positive FH if at least one first-degree relative had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The associations of FH with clinicopathologic features and survival were evaluated using logistic and Cox regression analyses. Results: Overall, 5323 (32.3 {\%}) men reported a FH of prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 9.9 years (IQR 5.9, 15.5). Patients with a FH were significantly more likely to have low-risk disease (47.7 vs. 43.0 {\%}; p <0.0001) and were significantly more likely to have organ-confined disease at RP (79.2 vs. 74.4 {\%}; p <0.0001). Men with FH had a significantly higher 10-year cancer-specific (99 vs. 97 {\%}; p <0.001) and overall survival (92 vs. 85 {\%}; p <0.001) than men without FH. Moreover, on multivariable analysis, FH of prostate cancer remained independently associated with reduced cancer-specific (HR 0.68; p = 0.003) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.69; p <0.0001). Conclusion: In this surgical population, FH of prostate cancer was associated with lower-risk disease at diagnosis, more favorable pathology at RP, and significantly better cancer-specific and overall survival. These results may be utilized for patient counseling.",
keywords = "Family history, Localized prostate cancer, Oncologic outcomes, Radical prostatectomy",
author = "Westerman, {Mary E.} and Boris Gershman and Karnes, {Robert Jeffrey} and Thompson, {R. Houston} and Laureano Rangel and Boorjian, {Stephen A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1007/s00345-015-1738-6",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "World Journal of Urology",
issn = "0724-4983",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of a family history of prostate cancer on clinicopathologic outcomes and survival following radical prostatectomy

AU - Westerman, Mary E.

AU - Gershman, Boris

AU - Karnes, Robert Jeffrey

AU - Thompson, R. Houston

AU - Rangel, Laureano

AU - Boorjian, Stephen A.

PY - 2015/12/9

Y1 - 2015/12/9

N2 - Purpose: While a family history (FH) of prostate cancer represents an established risk factor for prostate cancer diagnosis, conflicting data exist regarding the oncologic importance of FH. Herein, we evaluated the association of FH with clinicopathologic outcomes among men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods: We identified 16,472 men who underwent RP between 1987 and 2010 at Mayo Clinic. Patients were considered to have a positive FH if at least one first-degree relative had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The associations of FH with clinicopathologic features and survival were evaluated using logistic and Cox regression analyses. Results: Overall, 5323 (32.3 %) men reported a FH of prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 9.9 years (IQR 5.9, 15.5). Patients with a FH were significantly more likely to have low-risk disease (47.7 vs. 43.0 %; p <0.0001) and were significantly more likely to have organ-confined disease at RP (79.2 vs. 74.4 %; p <0.0001). Men with FH had a significantly higher 10-year cancer-specific (99 vs. 97 %; p <0.001) and overall survival (92 vs. 85 %; p <0.001) than men without FH. Moreover, on multivariable analysis, FH of prostate cancer remained independently associated with reduced cancer-specific (HR 0.68; p = 0.003) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.69; p <0.0001). Conclusion: In this surgical population, FH of prostate cancer was associated with lower-risk disease at diagnosis, more favorable pathology at RP, and significantly better cancer-specific and overall survival. These results may be utilized for patient counseling.

AB - Purpose: While a family history (FH) of prostate cancer represents an established risk factor for prostate cancer diagnosis, conflicting data exist regarding the oncologic importance of FH. Herein, we evaluated the association of FH with clinicopathologic outcomes among men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods: We identified 16,472 men who underwent RP between 1987 and 2010 at Mayo Clinic. Patients were considered to have a positive FH if at least one first-degree relative had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The associations of FH with clinicopathologic features and survival were evaluated using logistic and Cox regression analyses. Results: Overall, 5323 (32.3 %) men reported a FH of prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 9.9 years (IQR 5.9, 15.5). Patients with a FH were significantly more likely to have low-risk disease (47.7 vs. 43.0 %; p <0.0001) and were significantly more likely to have organ-confined disease at RP (79.2 vs. 74.4 %; p <0.0001). Men with FH had a significantly higher 10-year cancer-specific (99 vs. 97 %; p <0.001) and overall survival (92 vs. 85 %; p <0.001) than men without FH. Moreover, on multivariable analysis, FH of prostate cancer remained independently associated with reduced cancer-specific (HR 0.68; p = 0.003) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.69; p <0.0001). Conclusion: In this surgical population, FH of prostate cancer was associated with lower-risk disease at diagnosis, more favorable pathology at RP, and significantly better cancer-specific and overall survival. These results may be utilized for patient counseling.

KW - Family history

KW - Localized prostate cancer

KW - Oncologic outcomes

KW - Radical prostatectomy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949513596&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949513596&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00345-015-1738-6

DO - 10.1007/s00345-015-1738-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 26658661

AN - SCOPUS:84949513596

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - World Journal of Urology

JF - World Journal of Urology

SN - 0724-4983

ER -