Immunoglobulin V regions and the B cell

Alexander Keith Stewart, Robert S. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is now substantial evidence that a small group of V genes predominates in the Ig repertoire of preimmune B cells. This phenomenon of V gene restriction may reflect preferential accessibility of these genes to recombinase, homology-directed V gene rearrangement, promoters and enhancers of V gene transcription, or positive and negative selection mediated by the anti-self binding properties of the B cells surface Ig. These mechanisms may operate alone or in combination to influence V gene rearrangement and populations of immature B cells. Although constraints on the pool of rearranged V genes may seem disadvantageous to the immune system, the mechanisms that generate the CDR3s of heavy and light chains ensure extensive diversity in the pre-B-cell population. In mature B cells, somatic mutation of V genes adds further diversity. CDR3 sequences and somatic mutations not only provide potentially useful clonal markers but also help to identify the normal counterparts of malignant B cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1717-1730
Number of pages14
JournalBlood
Volume83
Issue number7
StatePublished - Apr 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Immunoglobulin Variable Region
B-Lymphocytes
Genes
Cells
B-Lymphoid Precursor Cells
Gene Rearrangement
Recombinases
Mutation
Population
Immune system
Immune System
Transcription
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Stewart, A. K., & Schwartz, R. S. (1994). Immunoglobulin V regions and the B cell. Blood, 83(7), 1717-1730.

Immunoglobulin V regions and the B cell. / Stewart, Alexander Keith; Schwartz, Robert S.

In: Blood, Vol. 83, No. 7, 01.04.1994, p. 1717-1730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stewart, AK & Schwartz, RS 1994, 'Immunoglobulin V regions and the B cell', Blood, vol. 83, no. 7, pp. 1717-1730.
Stewart AK, Schwartz RS. Immunoglobulin V regions and the B cell. Blood. 1994 Apr 1;83(7):1717-1730.
Stewart, Alexander Keith ; Schwartz, Robert S. / Immunoglobulin V regions and the B cell. In: Blood. 1994 ; Vol. 83, No. 7. pp. 1717-1730.
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