Immediate effects of thermal-tactile stimulation on timing of swallow in idiopathic parkinson's disease

Julie Regan, Margaret Walshe, William Tobin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oropharyngeal dysphagia frequently presents in people with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). Clinical sequelae of dysphagia in this group include weight loss and aspiration pneumonia, the latter of which is the leading cause of hospital admissions and death in IPD. Thermal-tactile stimulation (TTS) is a sensory technique whereby stimulation is provided to the anterior faucial pillars to speed up the pharyngeal swallow. The effects of TTS on swallowing have not yet been investigated in IPD. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of TTS on the timing of swallow in a cohort of people with IPD and known oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thirteen participants with IPD and known dysphagia attended for videofluoroscopy during which standardised volumes of liquid barium and barium paste were administered preceding and immediately subsequent to TTS. The immediate effects of TTS on swallowing were examined using oral, pharyngeal, and total transit times and pharyngeal delay times as outcome measures. TTS significantly reduced median pharyngeal transit time on fluids (0.20 s, 95% CI = 0.12-0.28, p = 0.004) and on paste (0.3 s, 95% CI = 0.08-0.66, p = 0.01). Median total transit time was also reduced on fluids (0.48 s, 95% CI = 0.00-1.17, p = 0.049) and on paste (0.52 s, 95% CI = 0.08-1.46, p = 0.033). Median pharyngeal delay time was reduced on fluids (0.20 s, 95% CI = 0.12-0.34, p = 0.002). TTS did not significantly alter median oral transit time on either fluid or paste consistency. TTS significantly reduced temporal measures of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing in the IPD population. Significant results may be attributed to the role of sensory stimulation in improving motor function in IPD, with emphasis on the impaired glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves in this population. It is still unclear whether these findings will translate into a clinically beneficial effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-215
Number of pages9
JournalDysphagia
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Touch
Deglutition
Parkinson Disease
Hot Temperature
Deglutition Disorders
Ointments
Barium
Glossopharyngeal Nerve
Aspiration Pneumonia
Vagus Nerve
Population
Weight Loss
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Deglutition
  • Deglutition disorders
  • Idiopathic Parkinson's disease
  • Immediate effects
  • Oropharyngeal dysphagia
  • Sensory stimulation
  • Thermal-tactile stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Immediate effects of thermal-tactile stimulation on timing of swallow in idiopathic parkinson's disease. / Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; Tobin, William.

In: Dysphagia, Vol. 25, No. 3, 09.2010, p. 207-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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