Image-guided tumor ablation in gynecologic oncology: Review of interventional oncology techniques and case examples highlighting a collaborative, multidisciplinary program

Michael R. Moynagh, Sean C. Dowdy, Brian Welch, Gretchen E. Glaser, John J. Schmitz, Aminah Jatoi, Carrie L. Langstraat, Matthew S. Block, Anil N Kurup, Amanika Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

As interventional oncology services within radiology mature, image-guided ablation techniques are increasingly applied to recurrent gynecologic malignancies. Ablation may be performed using thermal techniques like cryoablation, microwave ablation, or radiofrequency ablation, as well as non-thermal ones, such as focused ultrasound or irreversible electroporation. Feasibility and approach depend on tumor type, size, number, anatomic location, proximity of critical structures, and goals of therapy. Current indications include local control of limited metastatic disease or palliation of painful bone metastases refractory or unsuitable to conventional therapies. Technical aspects of these procedures, including methods to protect nearby critical structures are presented through illustrative examples. Cases amenable to image-guided ablation include, but are not limited to, hepatic or pulmonary metastases, musculoskeletal metastases, retroperitoneal nodal metastases, pelvic side wall disease, abdominal wall disease, and vaginal or vulvar tumors. Protective maneuvers, such as hydro-displacement of bowel, neuromonitoring, and retrograde pyeloperfusion through ureteral stents, permit safe ablation despite close proximity to vulnerable nerves or organs. Image-guided ablation offers an alternative modality to achieve local tumor control without the risks associated with surgery or systemic treatment in appropriately selected patients. A multidisciplinary approach to use of image-guided ablation includes collaboration between gynecologic oncology, interventional radiology, anesthesia, urology and radiation oncology teams allowing for appropriate patient-centered case selection. Long-term follow up and additional studies are needed to determine the oncologic benefits of such techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGynecologic oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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