Identification of the Rayleigh surface waves for estimation of viscoelasticity using the surface wave elastography technique

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Abstract

The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to demonstrate an effective method for estimating viscoelasticity based on measurements of the Rayleigh surface wave speed. It is important to identify the surface wave mode for measuring surface wave speed. A concept of start frequency of surface waves is proposed. The surface wave speeds above the start frequency should be used to estimate the viscoelasticity of tissue. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for assessing skin disease by measuring skin viscoelastic properties. Using an optical based SWE system, the author generated a local harmonic vibration on the surface of phantom using an electromechanical shaker and measured the resulting surface waves on the phantom using an optical vibrometer system. The surface wave speed was measured using a phase gradient method. It was shown that different standing wave modes were generated below the start frequency because of wave reflection. However, the pure symmetric surface waves were generated from the excitation above the start frequency. Using the wave speed dispersion above the start frequency, the viscoelasticity of the phantom can be correctly estimated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3619-3622
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume140
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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viscoelasticity
surface waves
modes (standing waves)
Waves
Viscoelasticity
vibration meters
wave reflection
estimating
harmonics
vibration
gradients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

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