IBS patients' willingness to take risks with medications

Brian E. Lacy, Kelly K. Everhart, Kirsten T. Weiser, Ryan DeLee, Sebastian Strobel, Corey Siegel, Michael D. Crowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We explored irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients' impulsivity and risk-taking behavior and their willingness to take medication risks. Methods: A validated questionnaire assessed the illness experience of IBS patients. A standard gamble evaluated respondents' willingness to take medication risks. Results: IBS patients with severe symptoms were more willing to take significant medication risks than those with mild or moderate symptoms. Impulsivity scores were not associated with an increased likelihood of taking medication risks. Age, gender, and years of IBS symptoms were not associated with medication risk-taking behavior. IBS patients reported they would accept a median 1% risk of sudden death for a 99% chance of cure for their symptoms using a hypothetical medication. Conclusions: IBS patients are willing to take significant medication risks to cure their symptoms. To counsel patients effectively, physicians must determine and understand IBS patients' risk aversion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)804-809
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume107
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Risk-Taking
Impulsive Behavior
Sudden Death
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Lacy, B. E., Everhart, K. K., Weiser, K. T., DeLee, R., Strobel, S., Siegel, C., & Crowell, M. D. (2012). IBS patients' willingness to take risks with medications. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 107(6), 804-809. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.485

IBS patients' willingness to take risks with medications. / Lacy, Brian E.; Everhart, Kelly K.; Weiser, Kirsten T.; DeLee, Ryan; Strobel, Sebastian; Siegel, Corey; Crowell, Michael D.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 107, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 804-809.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lacy, BE, Everhart, KK, Weiser, KT, DeLee, R, Strobel, S, Siegel, C & Crowell, MD 2012, 'IBS patients' willingness to take risks with medications', American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 107, no. 6, pp. 804-809. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.485
Lacy BE, Everhart KK, Weiser KT, DeLee R, Strobel S, Siegel C et al. IBS patients' willingness to take risks with medications. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2012 Jun;107(6):804-809. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.485
Lacy, Brian E. ; Everhart, Kelly K. ; Weiser, Kirsten T. ; DeLee, Ryan ; Strobel, Sebastian ; Siegel, Corey ; Crowell, Michael D. / IBS patients' willingness to take risks with medications. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2012 ; Vol. 107, No. 6. pp. 804-809.
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